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  • Explore composer Gallican Chant on 2 classical music works CDs to buy at CD Universe, including sound samples, songs, biographies, reviews, and more. — “Composer - Gallican Chant at CD Universe”,
  • Definition of Gallican in the Online Dictionary. Meaning of Gallican. Pronunciation of Gallican. Translations of Gallican. Gallican synonyms, Gallican antonyms. Information about Gallican in the free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. — “Gallican - definition of Gallican by the Free Online”,
  • The Gallican argument was that the pope was supreme in spiritual matters, but that temporal affairs were the In supporting king Louis XIV against Pope Innocent XI the French bishops prepared the "Four Gallican Articles. — “Gallicanism - Conservapedia”,
  • It was to the "Gallican" bishops that Pope Damasus addressed the most ancient decretal which has been preserved to our times Two centuries later St. Gregory the Great pointed out the Gallican Church to his envoy Augustine, the Apostle of England, as one of those whose. — “Gallicanism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • The Rite of Spain, fairly widely used from the fifth century to the end of the eleventh, and still lingering on as an archaeological survival in chapels at Toledo and Salamanca, was so nearly allied to the Gallican Rite that the term Hispano Gallican is often applied to the two. — “The Gallican Rite”,
  • This comparitive table of some Gallican lectionaries is from Dom Pierre Salmon's publication of The table is pages CIV through CXXIII. This is the key to the columns. — “Gallican Lectionaries”,
  • Encyclopedia article about Gallican. Information about Gallican in the Columbia Encyclopedia, Computer Desktop Encyclopedia, computing dictionary. — “Gallican definition of Gallican in the Free Online Encyclopedia”, encyclopedia2
  • Gallican Church, a name sometimes used as merely signifying the Catholic church in France, while more commonly it is applied to that church only so far as it holds to certain national privileges, doct. — “Gallican Church”,
  • The Parlement of Paris resisted the agreement on the ground of fidelity to ancient laws, or "Gallican liberties. There were eighty-three "Liberties of the Gallican Church", according to a collection drawn up by the jurisconsults Guy Coquille and Pierre Pithou. Besides the four articles cited above,. — “Gallicanism: Definition from ”,
  • Pithou, a Parisian lawyer, wrote The Liberties of the Gallican Church that year. Bossuet drew up the Gallican Articles, published by the Assembly of the Clergy in 1682. — “Gallicanism”, mb-
  • Definition of word from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary with audio pronunciations, thesaurus, Word of the Day, and word games. Gallican noun. — “Gallican - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster”, merriam-
  • GALLICAN ANGLICAN. Tuesday, October 26, 2010. Vive la difference. Yesterday English Roman Catholics observed the feast of Saints Cuthbert Mayne, John Houghton, Edmund Campion, Richard Gwynn and Thirty-Six Companions, aka the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales. — “GALLICAN ANGLICAN”,
  • Gallican Rite, The: I. History and Origin; II. MSS. and Other Sources; III. The Liturgical Year; IV. The Divine Office; V. The Mass; VI. The Occasional Services. Page scans include illustrations, maps, and images from the original Catholic. — “Gallican Rite, The - Original Catholic Encyclopedia”,
  • The Gallican Rite refers in the first instance to the liturgy of ancient Gaul (France) Various rites within the greater Gallican family have claimed various specific lineages,. — “Gallican Rite - OrthodoxWiki”,
  • of or pertaining to a school or party of French Roman Catholics, before 1870, advocating the restriction of papal authority in favor of the authority of general councils, the bishops, and temporal rulers. Use Gallican in a Sentence. See images of Gallican. Search Gallican on the Web. Origin:. — “Gallican | Define Gallican at ”,
  • Find dictionary definitions, audio pronunciations, and spellings for Gallican in the free online American Heritage Dictionary on Yahoo! Education. — “Gallican - Dictionary definition and pronunciation - Yahoo!”,

Videos
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  • Lucernarium: "Paravi lucernam Christo meo" Ambrosian chant (also known as Milanese chant) is the liturgical plainchant repertory of the Ambrosian rite of the Roman Catholic Church, related to but distinct from Gregorian chant. It is primarily associated with the Archdiocese of Milan, and named after St. Ambrose much as Gregorian chant is named after Gregory the Great. It is the only surviving plainchant tradition besides the Gregorian to maintain the official sanction of the Roman Catholic Church. Ambrosian chant is largely defined by its role in the liturgy of the Ambrosian rite, which is more closely related to the northern "Gallic" liturgies such as the Gallican rite and the Mozarabic rite than the Roman rite. Musically, however, Ambrosian chant is closely related to the Gregorian and Old Roman chant traditions. Many chants are common to all three, with musical variation. Like all plainchant, Ambrosian chant is monophonic and a cappella. In accordance with Roman Catholic tradition, it is primarily intended to be sung by males, and many Ambrosian chants specify who is to sing them, using phrases such as cum Pueris (by a boys' choir) and a Subdiaconis (by the subdeacons). Stylistically, the Ambrosian chant repertoire is not generally as musically uniform as the Gregorian. Ambrosian chants are more varied in length, ambitus, and structure. Even within individual categories of chant, Ambrosian chants vary from short and formulaic to prolix and melismatic, and may be freely composed or show significant internal ...
  • Alyson Williams - Holding Back The Years Cafe Soul Allstars feat.: Alyson Williams - Live performance of Simply Red's "Holding Back The Years" at BB King's NYC - Band: Bobby Lyle, Duke Jones, Kaspar Galli, Paul Frazier, Steve Williams, Rene McLean, Sal Giorgianni, Mark Minchello, Keith Fluitt, Chandra Armstead.
  • The Death of Sedevacantism QUOTES ONE: "It is also generally held, and rightly, that questions of dogmatic fact, in regard to which definite certainty is required for the safe custody and interpretation of revealed truth, may be determined infallibly by the Church. Such questions, for example, would be: whether a certain pope is legitimate..." (Toner, Patrick. "Infallibility." TheCatholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 7. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1910) TWO: "This was what might be described as an extra-constitutional crisis; and, as the Church has a right in such circumstances to remove reasonable doubt and provide a pope whose claims would be indisputable, even an acephalous council, supported by the body of bishops throughout the world, was competent to meet this altogether exceptional emergency without thereby setting up a precedent that could be erected into a regular constitutional rule, as theGallicans wrongly imagined." (Toner, Patrick. "Infallibility." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 7. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1910) THREE: "A similar exceptional situation might arise were a pope to become a public heretic, ie, were he publicly and officially to teach some doctrine clearly opposed to what has been defined as de fide catholicâ. But in this case many theologians hold that no formal sentence of deposition would be required, as, by becoming a public heretic, the pope would ipso facto cease to be pope. This, however, is a hypothetical case which has never actually occurred; even the case ...
  • The Gallican Practice - Tenebrae factae sunt - (9th century) The Gallican Practice - Tenebrae factae sunt - (9th century) Ensemble Organum Marcel Pérès There was darkness over the earth when the Jews crucified Jesus: and about the ninth hour Jesus cried with a loud voice: My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me? And he bowed his head and gave up the ghost. V. Jesus cried with a loud voice and said, Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit. And he bowed his head and gave up the ghost.
  • Julie et Gallican en op2 le 26/11/06
  • Whiskey Galore Live at Lengthwise Gallican Jig and Grumpy Uncle Hal Whiskey Galore Live at Lengthwise Brewery 3/12/2011 St Patrick's Celebration and CD Release Party
  • Peabo Bryson "Feel The Fire" feat.: Bobby Lyle & Glenn Jones Cafe Soul Allstars live feat.: Peabo Bryson, Glenn Jones and Bobby Lyle. Songs: GET UP, WATCHA GONNA DO, SHOW AND TELL, FEEL THE FIRE. Band: Bobby Lyle,Duke Jones,Kaspar Galli,Steve Williams,Paul Frazier,Sal Giorgianni,Rene McLean,Alyson Williams,Keith Fluitt, Chandra Armstead. Introduction by Vaughn Harper
  • Responsorium: "Congratulamini mihi omnes qui diligitis Dominum" Ambrosian chant (also known as Milanese chant) is the liturgical plainchant repertory of the Ambrosian rite of the Roman Catholic Church, related to but distinct from Gregorian chant. It is primarily associated with the Archdiocese of Milan, and named after St. Ambrose much as Gregorian chant is named after Gregory the Great. It is the only surviving plainchant tradition besides the Gregorian to maintain the official sanction of the Roman Catholic Church. Ambrosian chant is largely defined by its role in the liturgy of the Ambrosian rite, which is more closely related to the northern "Gallic" liturgies such as the Gallican rite and the Mozarabic rite than the Roman rite. Musically, however, Ambrosian chant is closely related to the Gregorian and Old Roman chant traditions. Many chants are common to all three, with musical variation. Like all plainchant, Ambrosian chant is monophonic and a cappella. In accordance with Roman Catholic tradition, it is primarily intended to be sung by males, and many Ambrosian chants specify who is to sing them, using phrases such as cum Pueris (by a boys' choir) and a Subdiaconis (by the subdeacons). Stylistically, the Ambrosian chant repertoire is not generally as musically uniform as the Gregorian. Ambrosian chants are more varied in length, ambitus, and structure. Even within individual categories of chant, Ambrosian chants vary from short and formulaic to prolix and melismatic, and may be freely composed or show significant internal ...
  • Gallican Waltz Gotic Harp
  • Gwen et Gallican en op3p le 19/11/06
  • régi épületek SWAP: Canzon XXIX super "Cantionem Gallican" artist: Les Sacqueboutiers album: Samuel Scheidt: Ludi Musici length: 5:05 label: naïve / Ambroisie genre: Classical
  • Whiskey Galore @ Lengthwise Brewery
  • ARCOMNIA at Singing Sticks 2010 playing Circle Sway Instrumental based on the Gallican chant 'Insignis Praeconiis'
  • Anthony Galli's High School Graduation Speech (Full Typed Speech) It is moments like this that truly remind us of how fast time fly's by. But what if I told you - you could slow time down? What if I told you - you could forget some moments and emphasize others? Well this you can do - as the director of your own movie. Would you be a villain or a hero? Would it be a drama or a comedy? Well however you cast yourself and whatever genre it maybe we must first thank our designers, cast members, and producers or in other words our teachers, friends, and families for making this production possible. As the director, would you emphasize high school? Would you include those times in the hall where you weren't sure if someone was waving at you or the kid next to you, so you waved anyway only to find out you were wrong. Or maybe those mornings where you hit snooze way to many times and had to blow every stop sign and cut everyone off with leftover toothpaste foaming from your mouth to make it to school on time. Or when you tried to be nice to your fellow classmates by sliding your answer key to the side of your desk only to have your teacher not return the kindness. Moments like these are part of growing up and for coming of age films, essential. Through our awkward and irresponsible mistakes, we mature. Good choices comes from experience and experience comes from bad choices. As my Grandma once said "we all make mistakes." So if your ever feeling down, just think you're not the first to hit the snooze button and that its never ...
  • Offertorium: "Ecce apertum est Templum tabernaculi" (2) Ambrosian chant (also known as Milanese chant) is the liturgical plainchant repertory of the Ambrosian rite of the Roman Catholic Church, related to but distinct from Gregorian chant. It is primarily associated with the Archdiocese of Milan, and named after St. Ambrose much as Gregorian chant is named after Gregory the Great. It is the only surviving plainchant tradition besides the Gregorian to maintain the official sanction of the Roman Catholic Church. Ambrosian chant is largely defined by its role in the liturgy of the Ambrosian rite, which is more closely related to the northern "Gallic" liturgies such as the Gallican rite and the Mozarabic rite than the Roman rite. Musically, however, Ambrosian chant is closely related to the Gregorian and Old Roman chant traditions. Many chants are common to all three, with musical variation. Like all plainchant, Ambrosian chant is monophonic and a cappella. In accordance with Roman Catholic tradition, it is primarily intended to be sung by males, and many Ambrosian chants specify who is to sing them, using phrases such as cum Pueris (by a boys' choir) and a Subdiaconis (by the subdeacons). Stylistically, the Ambrosian chant repertoire is not generally as musically uniform as the Gregorian. Ambrosian chants are more varied in length, ambitus, and structure. Even within individual categories of chant, Ambrosian chants vary from short and formulaic to prolix and melismatic, and may be freely composed or show significant internal ...
  • Whiskey Galore Live at Lengthwise - Rory McCloud A great time had by all at Lengthwise Brewery Bakersfield CA 3/12/2010
  • Gwen et Gallican en op2 le 17/12/2006
  • Julie et Gallican en op2 le 17/12/2006
  • Resonse to "OneTrueChurch" on Sedevacantism II PART 1: "It is also generally held, and rightly, that questions of dogmatic fact, in regard to which definite certainty is required for the safe custody and interpretation of revealed truth, may be determined infallibly by the Church. Such questions, for example, would be: whether a certain pope is legitimate..." (Toner, Patrick. "Infallibility." TheCatholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 7. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1910) "This was what might be described as an extra-constitutional crisis; and, as the Church has a right in such circumstances to remove reasonable doubt and provide a pope whose claims would be indisputable, even an acephalous council, supported by the body of bishops throughout the world, was competent to meet this altogether exceptional emergency without thereby setting up a precedent that could be erected into a regular constitutional rule, as theGallicans wrongly imagined." (Toner, Patrick. "Infallibility." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 7. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1910) "A similar exceptional situation might arise were a pope to become a public heretic, ie, were he publicly and officially to teach some doctrine clearly opposed to what has been defined as de fide catholicâ. But in this case many theologians hold that no formal sentence of deposition would be required, as, by becoming a public heretic, the pope would ipso facto cease to be pope. This, however, is a hypothetical case which has never actually occurred; even the case ...
  • Resonse to "OneTrueChurch" on Sedevacantism I PART 2: "It is also generally held, and rightly, that questions of dogmatic fact, in regard to which definite certainty is required for the safe custody and interpretation of revealed truth, may be determined infallibly by the Church. Such questions, for example, would be: whether a certain pope is legitimate..." (Toner, Patrick. "Infallibility." TheCatholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 7. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1910) "This was what might be described as an extra-constitutional crisis; and, as the Church has a right in such circumstances to remove reasonable doubt and provide a pope whose claims would be indisputable, even an acephalous council, supported by the body of bishops throughout the world, was competent to meet this altogether exceptional emergency without thereby setting up a precedent that could be erected into a regular constitutional rule, as theGallicans wrongly imagined." (Toner, Patrick. "Infallibility." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 7. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1910) "A similar exceptional situation might arise were a pope to become a public heretic, ie, were he publicly and officially to teach some doctrine clearly opposed to what has been defined as de fide catholicâ. But in this case many theologians hold that no formal sentence of deposition would be required, as, by becoming a public heretic, the pope would ipso facto cease to be pope. This, however, is a hypothetical case which has never actually occurred; even the case ...
  • The Declaration of Utrecht -- September 24, 1889. Music: The Secret Universe Link to Declaration of Utrecht text: www.fordham.edu Images: 1. Old Catholic Church of St. Gertrude in Utrecht 2. The Nicolaikerk Parish in Utrecht 3. Meeting of Old Catholic Bishops 4. The cover of The Augustinus, a final Catholic defense of St. Augustine's doctrines against Jesuit Semi-Pelagian attacks. 5. Michel De Bay, an Augustinian dissenter at Trent who was silenced by the abusive, Jesuit influenced hierarchy of the newly formed Roman Catholic Church, but continued to teach Augustine's doctrine of Sovereign Grace and Predestination. 6. Bishop Gerardus Gul, the Ultrajectine bishop of The Netherlands who presided over the Union of Utrecht with the Old Catholic Churches of Switzerland, Poland, Germany and Belgium. He was responsible for consecrating the bishops of these churches, as well as the first Old Catholic bishops of England and America. 7. Pasquier Quesnel, priest and preacher, defender of the Gallican Church's right to national sovereignty, author of "Moral Reflections on the Gospels", declared heretical in the Bull Unigenitus at the behest of fanatical semi-Pelagian Jesuit casuists. Last prominent Jansenist/Augustinian teacher before the excommunication of Bishop Gerardus. 8. Bishop Cornelius Jansen, student of Michel De Bay and Bishop of Ypres (in Belgium). Defender of Augustine's teachings on Sovereign Grace and Predestination, author of The Augustinus. Declared a post-humus heretic by Rome at the behest of ...
  • Ingressa: "Lux fulgebit hodie super nos" Ambrosian chant (also known as Milanese chant) is the liturgical plainchant repertory of the Ambrosian rite of the Roman Catholic Church, related to but distinct from Gregorian chant. It is primarily associated with the Archdiocese of Milan, and named after St. Ambrose much as Gregorian chant is named after Gregory the Great. It is the only surviving plainchant tradition besides the Gregorian to maintain the official sanction of the Roman Catholic Church. Ambrosian chant is largely defined by its role in the liturgy of the Ambrosian rite, which is more closely related to the northern "Gallic" liturgies such as the Gallican rite and the Mozarabic rite than the Roman rite. Musically, however, Ambrosian chant is closely related to the Gregorian and Old Roman chant traditions. Many chants are common to all three, with musical variation. Like all plainchant, Ambrosian chant is monophonic and a cappella. In accordance with Roman Catholic tradition, it is primarily intended to be sung by males, and many Ambrosian chants specify who is to sing them, using phrases such as cum Pueris (by a boys' choir) and a Subdiaconis (by the subdeacons). Stylistically, the Ambrosian chant repertoire is not generally as musically uniform as the Gregorian. Ambrosian chants are more varied in length, ambitus, and structure. Even within individual categories of chant, Ambrosian chants vary from short and formulaic to prolix and melismatic, and may be freely composed or show significant internal ...
  • Marie-Coline et Gallican en op1 26/11/06
  • Mozarabic Chant: Inlatio & Sanctus (Click for more info) The Inlatio for the feast of St. James the Great followed by the Sanctus, sung by Ensemble Organum from from 'Chant Mozarabe Cathédrale de Tolède (XVe siècle)'. The Mozarabic Inlatio, or Illatio, corresponds to the Roman Preface; as Dom Fernand Cabrol says of them (in his The Mass of the Western Rites): "hardly a Mass but has its own; some of them comprise many columns of text, and if they were sung, these must have lasted at least half an hour. We will attempt presently to discover their authors. But we may say at once that they form a dogmatic collection which is priceless for the study of theological history in Spain during the Middle Ages, and a collection which, it must be confessed, has as yet been but little studied. It contains pages which do honor to the learning, the depth, and the culture of Spanish theologians from the fifth-ninth centuries." Here is an from the Catholic Encyclopedia's article on the Mozarabic Rite: "The Illatio or Inlatio. This is called Praefatio in the Roman and Contestatio or Immolatio in the Gallican. With the Post-Sanctus it forms St. Isidore's fifth prayer. There are proper Illationes to every Mass. The form is similar to the Roman Preface, but generally longer and more diffuse, as in the Gallican. It is preceded by a longer dialogue than the usual one [...] The Illatio ends in all manner of ways, but always leading by way of the angels to the Sanctus." This particular Inlatio (from the Omnium Offerentium ...
  • Peabo Bryson & Cafe Soul Allstars "Can You Stop The Rain" Cafe Soul Allstars feat.: Peabo Bryson - Live performance of "Can You Stop The Rain" at BB King's NYC - Band: Bobby Lyle, Duke Jones, Kaspar Galli, Paul Frazier, Steve Williams, Rene McLean, Sal Giorgianni, Mark Minchello, Alyson Williams, Keith Fluitt, Chandra Armstead.
  • Canticum: "Ecce quam bonum et jocundum" Ambrosian chant (also known as Milanese chant) is the liturgical plainchant repertory of the Ambrosian rite of the Roman Catholic Church, related to but distinct from Gregorian chant. It is primarily associated with the Archdiocese of Milan, and named after St. Ambrose much as Gregorian chant is named after Gregory the Great. It is the only surviving plainchant tradition besides the Gregorian to maintain the official sanction of the Roman Catholic Church. Ambrosian chant is largely defined by its role in the liturgy of the Ambrosian rite, which is more closely related to the northern "Gallic" liturgies such as the Gallican rite and the Mozarabic rite than the Roman rite. Musically, however, Ambrosian chant is closely related to the Gregorian and Old Roman chant traditions. Many chants are common to all three, with musical variation. Like all plainchant, Ambrosian chant is monophonic and a cappella. In accordance with Roman Catholic tradition, it is primarily intended to be sung by males, and many Ambrosian chants specify who is to sing them, using phrases such as cum Pueris (by a boys' choir) and a Subdiaconis (by the subdeacons). Stylistically, the Ambrosian chant repertoire is not generally as musically uniform as the Gregorian. Ambrosian chants are more varied in length, ambitus, and structure. Even within individual categories of chant, Ambrosian chants vary from short and formulaic to prolix and melismatic, and may be freely composed or show significant internal ...
  • hecofimezomi: Provincial Gallican "uses," will be surprised to find one where they.
  • typezenuxaquq: Even to-day, the official organs of the Gallican.
  • jofucuki: Provincial Gallican "uses," will be surprised to find one where they.
  • ChurroGame: RT @gbabyboss: "Don't make me shoot you" "my name is Gallican, don't make me finger my wet wide spread vagina"

Blogs & Forum
blogs and forums about gallican

  • “MusicaSacra Forum. MusicaSacra Home. All Discussions. Categories. Job The Gallican Church, in far distant times, had established a rite and maintained it”
    — MusicaSacra Forum - Anathemas against the adversaries of,

  • “The sound of Gregorian chant Tractus: Domine, audivi Nova Schola Gregoriana / Alberto Turco Naxos 8. Roman school, probably by blending the Roman and Gallican styles, although exactly what he did is not clear”
    — The history of the classical music @ 就是要開花 :: 痞客邦 PIXNET ::,

  • “Gallican Lectionaries Comparison Chart. East Syrian Lectionaries. Lectionary of the Monastery of `Azīzā'el, Mardin. Lectionary of A Commonplace Blog. An Untitled Blog. Anecdotal Evidence. Astronomy”
    — biblicalia | biblica + alia = biblicalia,

  • “the Gallican Church's response to the challenges of the Enlightenment.[9] Second, over the "Gallican liberties" had long entrenched ecclesiological disputes in the French”
    — Microsoft Word - Bergin1, h-

  • “The Discussion Community message board is a forum for Eastern Orthodox Christians to discuss Christian Orthodoxy in its patristic, monastic, liturgical and ecclesiastical heritage, especially in its theology and traditions”
    — Latin text of Gallican Psalter online? - Who Posted?,

  • “America is the national Catholic Weekly magazine published by the Jesuits. The Roman Rite with Gallican additions used (in Latin) by nearly all the Latin Church”
    — America Magazine,

  • “Father Pierre Blet, SJ, Professor of Church History at the Gregorian University, celebrated for his defence of Pope Pius XII against the charge the so called "Gallican" Rite different from the Roman Rite so it should be called "Gallican"”
    — Forum, .hk

  • “kmusic. Gallican chant”
    — kmusic,

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