nasalized

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  • [edit] Verb. nasalized. Simple past tense and past participle of nasalize. [edit] Anagrams. aldazines. Retrieved /wiki/nasalized" Categories: English simple past forms. — “nasalized - Wiktionary”,
  • been nasalized first, and then the mid vowels and. finally the higher nasalized vowels are perceived as lower [2, 6] and. low vowels need a greater degree of. — “TEMPORAL EXTENT OF NASALIZATION RELATIVE TO THE TONGUE”, icphs2007.de
  • Definition of nasalized in the Online Dictionary. Meaning of nasalized. Pronunciation of nasalized. Translations of nasalized. nasalized synonyms, nasalized antonyms. Information about nasalized in the free online English dictionary and. — “nasalized - definition of nasalized by the Free Online”,
  • Note that the nasalized vowel indicated with final nh is always the last sound in the word. After a nasal consonant (/m/ or /n/), a long vowel is often nasalized, especially before the sibilant sounds listed above (/z/, /s/, /zh/, and /sh/). Nichols and Nyhom. — “Anishinaabemowin Grammar”, imp.lss.wisc.edu
  • Definition of nasalized from Webster's New World College Dictionary. Meaning of nasalized. Pronunciation of nasalized. Definition of the word nasalized. Origin of the word nasalized. — “nasalized - Definition of nasalized at ”,
  • Home - Quote Topics - Quotes of the Day - Quote Keywords - Author W X Y Z. Definition of Nasalized. Nasalized. of Nasalize. Related Definitions: Nasalize, Of. — “Definition of Nasalized”,
  • There is a tendency the nasalized [] to be equalized with []. In contemporary French the vowels are not nasalized in front of double -mm- / -nn-, cf. The m and n that close a syllable are not pronounced, but nasalize the preceding vowel (see Nasalized Vowels). — “French language: Spelling”,
  • These online Language Introductions are designed to provide the ability to read early Indo-European texts, with or without the help of translations. The dative of the toponym Emʰuin is furthermore nasalized by the preceding nasalizing preposition iN, thus nEmʰuin. — “Old Irish Online: Lesson 1”, utexas.edu
  • 3 Aerodynamic evidence for nasalized voiceless fricatives. Intuitively, nasalized voiceless fricatives make for improbable speech Cohn also mentions reports of nasalized voiceless fricatives in Ìgbò. — “To appear in the International Journal of American”, unc.edu
  • More important, in Standard Dutch as well as in a number of Dutch dialects, especially those of the sou­thern part of the language area, a type of nasalization occurs by which a short vowel is nasalized when it is followed by a tautosyllabic nasal consonant, followed by another consonant. — “A Triggered Nasalization - Jan Stroop”,
  • This sound only occurs before a nasalized vowel and the sound [w] is not pronounced before a nasalized vowel; therefore the bilabial nasal is considered the variant of /w/ in the position before a nasalized vowel and not a member of the inventory of distinct consonants of Eyak. — “WALS - Absence of Common Consonants”,
  • lexical item or a nasalized vowel followed by a. nasal consonant, they mistaken for nasalized vowels in 0.09% of the. trials, and nasalized vowels were mistaken. — “The Perception of Nasalized Vowels in American English: An”, bcs.rochester.edu
  • sequences are possible in Awetí (focusing on stops, pre-nasalized stops and nasals) and which 4. Non-final plosives or affricates are pre-nasalized adjacent at the right of a nasal vowel. — “NASAL HARMONY IN AWET :”, revel.inf.br
  • One common historical development in languages with distinctively nasalized vowels is the explanation: that velar nasals, having no oral antiformants, are acoustically more similar to nasalized. — “The Acoustic and Visual Phonetic Basis of Place of”, linguistics.berkeley.edu
  • In the International Phonetic Alphabet nasalization is indicated by printing a tilde above the symbol for the sound to be nasalized: [ã] is the nasalized equivalent of [a], and [ṽ] is the nasalized equivalent of [v] Nasalized versions of other consonant sounds also exist, though they. — “Nasalization - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • French nasalized vowels. My formal learning of French ended at O Level (= today's GCSE), though I later did a course in French phonetics as a postgraduate at UCL. So I can sort of get by in the language, but am far from being an expert on it. — “John Wells's phonetic blog: French nasalized vowels”, phonetic-
  • Processes in which nasalized laryngeals are involved include repercussions that the recognition of a class of nasalized laryngeals has on the. — “6 Nasalized laryngeals”,
  • Most consonants can't be nasalized, or rather a nasalized B just is an M. They are the However, it is extremely rare to have nasalized sonorants as phoneme s: usually they are. — [email protected], everything2.com
  • Nasalized versions of other consonant sounds also exist, though they are much rarer than either nasal stops or nasal vowels. Besides nasalized oral fricatives, there are true nasal fricatives, called nareal fricatives, sometimes produced by people with speech defects. — “Nasalization”,
  • Wysłany: 16-06-2004, 14:25 Sindarin: voiceless, nasalized stops Furthermore this was obviously written just that way (nasalized tinco, calma/quessë resp. — “Elendili - Przyjaciele Elfów :: Zobacz temat - Sindarin”, elendili.pl
  • Note: click on a word meaning below to see its connections and related words. The noun nasal consonant has one meaning: Meaning #1 : a continuant In Brazilian Portuguese nh is frequently pronounced as a nasalized [ j ], that is, as a nasal glide. — “Nasal consonant: Information from ”,

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  • North American English -- Pronunciation of Vowels This covers the pronunciaiton of vowels in North American English. There are about 16 vowels officially in North America and 14 are recognized as standard. In addition, I've included some dipthongs and glides. Each set contains words organized by four processes that change the pronunciation of the vowel: short, lengthened, nasalized, back/throaty.
  • French Vowels Spoken by a native French speaker (thanks Nathalie!)
  • Om #3 From the Wiki People: Om or Aum (also Auṃ, written in Devanāgari as ॐ and as ओम्, in Sanskrit known as praṇava प्रणव [lit. "to sound out loudly"], Omkara, or Auṃkāra (also as Aumkāra) ओंकार (lit. "Auṃ form/syllable"), is a sacred/mystical syllable in the Dharma or Indian religions, ie Sanatan Dharma, Hinduism, Jainism, and Buddhism. Aum is pronounced as a long or over-long nasalized close-mid back rounded vowel, [õːː]), though there are other enunciations adhered to in received traditions. It is placed at the beginning of most Hindu texts as a sacred incantation to be intoned at the beginning and end of a reading of the Vedas or prior to any prayer or mantra. The Māndukya Upanishad is entirely devoted to the explanation of the syllable. The syllable consists of three phonemes, a Vaishvanara,[1] u Hiranyagarbha and m Iswara, which symbolize the beginning, duration, and dissolution of the universe and the associated gods Brahma, Vishnu, and Shiva, respectively. Peace2U Sumanguru
  • French nasal vowels pronounced without the following nasal consonant French nasal vowels must be pronounced without the nasal consonant that follows in the spelling of the word: "danser le cancan" "comte" "encore" "tenter" "embrasser" "princesse" "Le comte va encore tenter d'embrasser la princesse."
  • 潮州菜:蟹肉空心菜羹(Crab meat Chinese Water Spinach Soup) 潮菜:蟹肉空心菜羹Chinese (Chaozhou / Teochew) dish : Crab meat Chinese Water Spinach Soup 蟹肉空心菜羹(TC: Hoi Nêg êng Cai Gên) ( Gên is pronounced like Gê'r with silent 'r' nasalized sound) 蟹肉(crab meat) hoi nêg -- 空心菜(Chinese water spinach) kong sim cai (in TC this veggie is called 蕹菜êng cai) -- 鸡蛋清(chicken egg white) goi neng cêng -- 上汤(broth) siang teng **** 羹(soup with thick viscosity) Gên 口感(food sensation in your mouth) kao gak
  • Donald Fagen Live In Toronto Fagen plans to perform most of the album live when he visits Massey Hall in Toronto tonight with his first-ever touring band (he played Ottawa 's National Arts Centre yesterday). For most of their association, Fagen and Becker have been profoundly averse to touring. In fact, between 1974 and 1993, the two Dans, as individuals and as a combo, were exclusively a studio outfit. Inviting one top musician after another to play their meticulously crafted songs, the duo would accumulate hundreds of reels of unused tape and thousands of hours of outtakes along the way. Today, Fagen insists such dedication didn't exemplify some perverse quest for perfection. Bringing in a Wayne Shorter or Mark Knopfler, often to play a part that lasted no more than 32 bars in the final recording, "happened in the process of Walter and me searching for musicians for an ideal band. In the seventies, there weren't that many musicians with equal facility in R&B and jazz." By the nineties, "we got closer to that vision and started keeping guys we really started to jell with. And by 2000, we ended up with guys who seemed to know what we're after." Indeed, the last two Steely Dan records, Two Against Nature (2000) and Everything Must Go (2003), as well as Morph the Cat, have a remarkably stable cast of support musicians, with only the odd marquee player putting in a brief appearance. The late, great Mel Tormé was a big fan of Fagen's, featuring at least two of his compositions, The Goodbye Look and Walk ...
  • Open Up Your Heart Buck Norris sings "Open Up Your Heart" by Buck Owens. Buck Owens Live: Alvis Edgar Owens Jr. was born in Sherman, Texas, on Aug. 12, 1929, and at age 3 or 4 nicknamed himself "Buck" after a mule on the family farm. The family moved west in 1937, settling in Mesa, Ariz., after their trailer hitch broke in Phoenix. Dropping out of school at 13, he taught himself to play guitar. By 1951, he had moved to Bakersfield, Calif., and eventually found success in its thriving country music scene. In the clubs of Bakersfield, Owens developed a trademark twisted-note style on his solid body Fender Telecaster. Initially recording as lead guitarist for Tommy Collins in 1953 (on "You Better Not Do That") and then singing for the small Pep and Chesterfield labels, Owens landed on Capitol Records in 1957. When his first single for Capitol fizzled, Owens moved to Puyallup, Wash., (a Tacoma suburb) to pursue a radio career. There he met Don Rich (real name Donald Eugene Ulrich), whose high, nasalized harmony vocals would combine with Owens' singing and chugging 2/4 freight train rhythm to make Owens' recordings distinctive. (Rich remained Owens' charismatic right-hand man until he died in a motorcycle accident in 1974.) In 1959, Owens hit with a recording of "Second Fiddle" in the Ray Price "shuffle" style. Later that year, the success of "Under Your Spell Again" led Owens to return to Bakersfield and form a band, the Buckaroos. In 1963, his recording of Johnny Russell's "Act ...
  • How to Pronounce the IPA Vowels Part 2 In the second part, we take a look at more difficult vowels that occur between the main vowels. I explain in what languages you are likely to find these vowels, with many examples from Germanic and Chinese languages. Also discussed are vowel length and vowel nasality.
  • Bossa style Chinese / Min-nan ballad (with translation) Song Title : Sharing one-Half Synopsis: A girl duet finds fame on the stage after much coaching by their god-mother. When success was just around the corner, one of the team fell ill with cancer, dashing all her hopes and her pursuit of true love. Translation: When we each share one half - Our feelings cannot be torn apart When we each share a quarter - Our feelings would last forever As time goes by Tears flow in the silence I pursue you with my whole heart This is my true love for you Chorus: A person like me Waiting for you like this Waiting for your glance of acknowledgement Because of love I toss and turn I don't care about the hurt I feel I am happy just to live for you A person like me Please don't laugh at me Like a fool I repress the heartache Even in the winter cold Even though it's cruel I am waiting for you to remember this broken man When we each share one half Our feelings cannot be torn apart If we really have found true love, why do we need to part? If we really have found true love, why do you think of parting? .
  • Streets Of Bakersfield Stereo: Buck Norris sings "Streets Of Bakersfield by Buck Owens and Dwight Yoakum. Alvis Edgar Owens Jr. was born in Sherman, Texas, on Aug. 12, 1929, and at age 3 or 4 nicknamed himself "Buck" after a mule on the family farm. The family moved west in 1937, settling in Mesa, Ariz., after their trailer hitch broke in Phoenix. Dropping out of school at 13, he taught himself to play guitar. By 1951, he had moved to Bakersfield, Calif., and eventually found success in its thriving country music scene. In the clubs of Bakersfield, Owens developed a trademark twisted-note style on his solid body Fender Telecaster. Initially recording as lead guitarist for Tommy Collins in 1953 (on "You Better Not Do That") and then singing for the small Pep and Chesterfield labels, Owens landed on Capitol Records in 1957. When his first single for Capitol fizzled, Owens moved to Puyallup, Wash., (a Tacoma suburb) to pursue a radio career. There he met Don Rich (real name Donald Eugene Ulrich), whose high, nasalized harmony vocals would combine with Owens' singing and chugging 2/4 freight train rhythm to make Owens' recordings distinctive. (Rich remained Owens' charismatic right-hand man until he died in a motorcycle accident in 1974.) In 1959, Owens hit with a recording of "Second Fiddle" in the Ray Price "shuffle" style. Later that year, the success of "Under Your Spell Again" led Owens to return to Bakersfield and form a band, the Buckaroos. In 1963, his recording of Johnny ...
  • Act Naturally Buck Billo and Maxi sing "Act Naturally" by Buck Owens and written by Johnny Russell. Buck Owens Live: Ringo Star Live: In the clubs of Bakersfield, Owens developed a trademark twisted-note style on his solid body Fender Telecaster. Initially recording as lead guitarist for Tommy Collins in 1953 (on "You Better Not Do That") and then singing for the small Pep and Chesterfield labels, Owens landed on Capitol Records in 1957. When his first single for Capitol fizzled, Owens moved to Puyallup, Wash., (a Tacoma suburb) to pursue a radio career. There he met Don Rich (real name Donald Eugene Ulrich), whose high, nasalized harmony vocals would combine with Owens' singing and chugging 2/4 freight train rhythm to make Owens' recordings distinctive. (Rich remained Owens' charismatic right-hand man until he died in a motorcycle accident in 1974.) In 1959, Owens hit with a recording of "Second Fiddle" in the Ray Price "shuffle" style. Later that year, the success of "Under Your Spell Again" led Owens to return to Bakersfield and form a band, the Buckaroos. In 1963, his recording of Johnny Russell's "Act Naturally" stayed at No. 1 for four weeks, and "Love's Gonna Live Here" spent 16 weeks atop the charts. Throughout the '60s, his recordings regularly topped the country chart including "My Heart Skips a Beat," "I Don't Care (Just As Long As You Love Me)," "I've Got a Tiger by the Tail," "Before You Go," "Waitin' in Your Welfare Line," "Think of Me ...
  • Tiger By The Tail Buck Norris sings "Tiger By The Tail" by Buck Owens. Buck Owens on Hee Haw: Alvis Edgar Owens Jr. was born in Sherman, Texas, on Aug. 12, 1929, and at age 3 or 4 nicknamed himself "Buck" after a mule on the family farm. The family moved west in 1937, settling in Mesa, Ariz., after their trailer hitch broke in Phoenix. Dropping out of school at 13, he taught himself to play guitar. By 1951, he had moved to Bakersfield, Calif., and eventually found success in its thriving country music scene. In the clubs of Bakersfield, Owens developed a trademark twisted-note style on his solid body Fender Telecaster. Initially recording as lead guitarist for Tommy Collins in 1953 (on "You Better Not Do That") and then singing for the small Pep and Chesterfield labels, Owens landed on Capitol Records in 1957. When his first single for Capitol fizzled, Owens moved to Puyallup, Wash., (a Tacoma suburb) to pursue a radio career. There he met Don Rich (real name Donald Eugene Ulrich), whose high, nasalized harmony vocals would combine with Owens' singing and chugging 2/4 freight train rhythm to make Owens' recordings distinctive. (Rich remained Owens' charismatic right-hand man until he died in a motorcycle accident in 1974.) In 1959, Owens hit with a recording of "Second Fiddle" in the Ray Price "shuffle" style. Later that year, the success of "Under Your Spell Again" led Owens to return to Bakersfield and form a band, the Buckaroos. In 1963, his recording of Johnny Russell's ...
  • Sean-nós, Birds & Secret Longings -_-) שון-נוס, צפורים וגעגועים בסתר (C) Nell Ní Chróinín // SEAN-NóS song (Irish for "old style") is a highly ornamented style of unaccompanied traditional Irish singing. It is a sean-nós activity, which also includes sean-nós dancing. These forms of Irish dance and song have been documented by scholars of ethnomusicology, musicology, linguistics and other fields such as Hugh Shields, Tom Munnelly, Fintan Vallely, and Lillis Ó Laoire. Sean-nós singing is a highly-ornamented style of solo, unaccompanied singing defined by Tomas O'Canainn as "a rather complex way of singing in Gaelic, confined mainly to some areas in the west and south of the country. It is unaccompanied and has a highly ornamented melodic line....Not all areas have the same type of ornamentation -one finds a very florid line in Connacht, contrasting with a somewhat less decorated one in the south, and, by comparison, a stark simplicity in the northern songs"... Ó'Canainn also asserts that, "...no aspect of Irish music can be fully understood without a deep appreciation of sean-nós singing. It is the key which opens every lock'. Sean-nós songs can be relatively simple, though many are long, extremely stylized and melodically complex. A good performance classically involves substantial ornament and rhythmic variations from verse to verse. Ó Canainn identifies most ornamentation as melismatic ornamentation. This is when a note is replaced or emphasized by a group of adjoining notes, unlike intervallic ornamentation, in which additional notes ...
  • Ioway Otoe Language part 4 This video will cover Glottal Stops along with Nasalized Vowels and Consonants
  • Open Up Your Heart Buck Norris sings "Open Up Your Heart" by Buck Owens. Alvis Edgar Owens Jr. was born in Sherman, Texas, on Aug. 12, 1929, and at age 3 or 4 nicknamed himself "Buck" after a mule on the family farm. The family moved west in 1937, settling in Mesa, Ariz., after their trailer hitch broke in Phoenix. Dropping out of school at 13, he taught himself to play guitar. By 1951, he had moved to Bakersfield, Calif., and eventually found success in its thriving country music scene. In the clubs of Bakersfield, Owens developed a trademark twisted-note style on his solid body Fender Telecaster. Initially recording as lead guitarist for Tommy Collins in 1953 (on "You Better Not Do That") and then singing for the small Pep and Chesterfield labels, Owens landed on Capitol Records in 1957. When his first single for Capitol fizzled, Owens moved to Puyallup, Wash., (a Tacoma suburb) to pursue a radio career. There he met Don Rich (real name Donald Eugene Ulrich), whose high, nasalized harmony vocals would combine with Owens' singing and chugging 2/4 freight train rhythm to make Owens' recordings distinctive. (Rich remained Owens' charismatic right-hand man until he died in a motorcycle accident in 1974.) In 1959, Owens hit with a recording of "Second Fiddle" in the Ray Price "shuffle" style. Later that year, the success of "Under Your Spell Again" led Owens to return to Bakersfield and form a band, the Buckaroos. In 1963, his recording of Johnny Russell's "Act Naturally" stayed at No. 1 for ...
  • Aum chant Omh/Aum, a symbol of Hindu faith, is one of the most sacred symbols in Hinduism. Studies have shown that this sound has healing and relaxing effects. The symbol comes from Devnagiri, a script based on Sanskrit, from which many Indian and other languages have emerge Aum is commonly pronounced as a long or over-long nasalized close-mid back rounded vowel,though there are other enunciations pronounced in received traditions. It is placed at the beginning of most Hindu texts as a sacred exclamation to be uttered at the beginning and end of a reading of the Vedas or previously to any prayer or mantra. The Mandukya Upanishad is entirely devoted to the explanation of the syllable. The syllable is taken to consist of three phonemes, a, u and m, variously symbolizing the Three Vedas or the Hindu Trimurti or three stages in life ( birth, life and death ). Though ostensibly in some traditions it is polysyllabic and vocalized as a triphthong, the Omkara is held to move through and contain all vowels possible in human speech. download link for the full mp3: www.easy-
  • klaɪn Abhorrence of nasalized vowels
  • Hlreem (Bagalamukhi Bija Mantra) (108 Reps) ***Dedicated to Kikka *** Bagalamukhi means "The Crane-Headed One". This bird is thought of as the essence of deceit. She rules magic for the suppression of an enemy's gossip. These enemies also have an inner meaning, and the peg she puts through the tongue may be construed as a peg or paralysis of our own prattling talk. She rules deceit which is at the heart of most speech. Easiest to just chant as you focus on the Yantra or on she who has two arms, wears yellow garments, with three eyes, a body of effulgence, holding in her hands chisel and hammer, the Bagalamukhi. Baglamukhi yantra (A geometrical diagram used as a meditation aid) is very powerful and useful yantra for victory over enemies, law suits, success in quarrels and competitions. The presiding deity goddess Baglamukhi is the controller of this powerful Yantra which charges Yantra with occult forces. For realization of Goddess Bagalamukhi, quick elimination of all enemies, fierce power, victory, fame, elimination of tantra badha, nullifying maran proyogs of enemies and all round success. Also creates a strong base for Bagalamukhi Mahavidya sadhana. At end of chanting, close your eyes and concentrate on the deity to bless you with wishes.Now with all sincerity, ask God to grant you the desire of your life that you wanted to be fulfilled in your own language PRONUNCIATION: The H is read as in English "hit" , lr is read as lr from English "already" then we have a ...
  • Albanian language: Ancient Fathers Call for the Truth !! Albanian is a direct descendant of a south-west group of Illyrian dialects. However, there have been other hypotheses proposed, among which the following merit to be mentioned. A. The Pelasgian hypothesis. Albanian is the continuation of the language of an ancient people called Pelasgians, a hypothesis rather diffused in the 19th century. JG von HAHN (1854) formulated in a strict manner the More..hypothesis that the Albanians are direct descendants of the Illyrians, Macedonians, and Epirotes, and that in the remotest times they formed a united race together with the Latins and the Hellenes called Pelasgians, with their language, the Pelasgian. A. SCHLEICHER gave full authority to this theory of Pelasgian origin with his family tree of languages. Today this is considered a groundless idea. . B. The Thracian (Dacian) hypothesis. Albanian is the continuation of the Thracian language. This thesis, implying an Albanian-Rumanian symbiosis, is supported by students of Rumanian: H. HIRT, K. PAUL, G. WEIGAND, H. BARIC, I. POPOVIC, and II RUSSU. Only scant remains of Thracian exist, but HIRT saw Albanians as descendants of the Thracians. This means that in the early Middle Ages the Albanians moved westward from the central part of the Balkans, but there are no historical records of such a massive migration. To BARIC Albanian is an Illyricized Thracian dialect. . C. The Illyrian-Thracian hypothesis. Albanian is derived from a mixture of Illyrian and Thracian. N. JOKL supported the ...
  • Crying Time Buck Norris sings "Crying Time Again" by Buck Owens and earlier by Ferlin Husky and Faron Young Alvis Edgar Owens Jr. was born in Sherman, Texas, on Aug. 12, 1929, and at age 3 or 4 nicknamed himself "Buck" after a mule on the family farm. The family moved west in 1937, settling in Mesa, Ariz., after their trailer hitch broke in Phoenix. Dropping out of school at 13, he taught himself to play guitar. By 1951, he had moved to Bakersfield, Calif., and eventually found success in its thriving country music scene. In the clubs of Bakersfield, Owens developed a trademark twisted-note style on his solid body Fender Telecaster. Initially recording as lead guitarist for Tommy Collins in 1953 (on "You Better Not Do That") and then singing for the small Pep and Chesterfield labels, Owens landed on Capitol Records in 1957. When his first single for Capitol fizzled, Owens moved to Puyallup, Wash., (a Tacoma suburb) to pursue a radio career. There he met Don Rich (real name Donald Eugene Ulrich), whose high, nasalized harmony vocals would combine with Owens' singing and chugging 2/4 freight train rhythm to make Owens' recordings distinctive. (Rich remained Owens' charismatic right-hand man until he died in a motorcycle accident in 1974.) In 1959, Owens hit with a recording of "Second Fiddle" in the Ray Price "shuffle" style. Later that year, the success of "Under Your Spell Again" led Owens to return to Bakersfield and form a band, the Buckaroos. In 1963, his recording of Johnny ...
  • NM 4 years old with submucous cleft palate Video voice and digital recordings
  • Sakara Music - From a 1952 Field Recording in Dahomey (Republic of Benin) Artist: Adjado Year: 1952 Sakara music is a form of popular Yoruba music based in the traditions of Yoruba people of Nigeria and Republic of Benin (Old Dahomey/Abomey). It is a Moslem-influenced style, mostly in the form of praise songs, that uses only traditional Yoruba instruments such as the solemn-sounding Goje violin, and the small round Sakara drum, which is similar to a tambourine and is beaten with a stick. Sakara music overlays the nasalized, melismatic vocals of Islamic music on the traditional percussion instruments. The music is often brooding and philosophical in mood. One of the first performers of this type of music in Lagos was Abibu Oluwa, who started playing in the 1930s. On his death in 1964 his place in the band was taken by Salami Alabi (Lefty) Balogun (October 1913 - 29 December 1981), a talking drummer, who released over 35 records. Other members of the band included Baba Mukaila, and Joseph (Yussuf) Olatunju (alias Baba l'Egba), who died in 1978, did much to popularize the musical genre and released many records on the Phillips Nigeria label. A street in Abeokuta is named after him. Sakara music had considerable influence on other genres, including Jùjú and Nigerian Hip Hop. Fuji music is a mixture of Muslim traditional Were music with elements drawn from Sakara and Apala music. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  • Mike Edgerton, voice_Alter Sankt Jacobi Friedhof in Berlin from a performance in the old Saint Jacob Cemetery (Alter Sankt Jacobi Friedhof) in Berlin 2010_06_12. Voiced and unvoiced sonorities consisting of the reinforcement of the resonator is followed by barely voiced transient sounds that are nearly glottal whistles and ending with nasalized epiglottal articulation serving to highlight harmonics at the labial opening.
  • Tiger By The Tail Buck Norris sings "Tiger By The Tail" by Buck Owens. Alvis Edgar Owens Jr. was born in Sherman, Texas, on Aug. 12, 1929, and at age 3 or 4 nicknamed himself "Buck" after a mule on the family farm. The family moved west in 1937, settling in Mesa, Ariz., after their trailer hitch broke in Phoenix. Dropping out of school at 13, he taught himself to play guitar. By 1951, he had moved to Bakersfield, Calif., and eventually found success in its thriving country music scene. In the clubs of Bakersfield, Owens developed a trademark twisted-note style on his solid body Fender Telecaster. Initially recording as lead guitarist for Tommy Collins in 1953 (on "You Better Not Do That") and then singing for the small Pep and Chesterfield labels, Owens landed on Capitol Records in 1957. When his first single for Capitol fizzled, Owens moved to Puyallup, Wash., (a Tacoma suburb) to pursue a radio career. There he met Don Rich (real name Donald Eugene Ulrich), whose high, nasalized harmony vocals would combine with Owens' singing and chugging 2/4 freight train rhythm to make Owens' recordings distinctive. (Rich remained Owens' charismatic right-hand man until he died in a motorcycle accident in 1974.) In 1959, Owens hit with a recording of "Second Fiddle" in the Ray Price "shuffle" style. Later that year, the success of "Under Your Spell Again" led Owens to return to Bakersfield and form a band, the Buckaroos. In 1963, his recording of Johnny Russell's "Act Naturally" stayed at No. 1 for ...
  • Tiger By The Tail Buck Billo and Maxi sing "Tiger By The Tail" by Buck Owens. Alvis Edgar Owens Jr. was born in Sherman, Texas, on Aug. 12, 1929, and at age 3 or 4 nicknamed himself "Buck" after a mule on the family farm. The family moved west in 1937, settling in Mesa, Ariz., after their trailer hitch broke in Phoenix. Dropping out of school at 13, he taught himself to play guitar. By 1951, he had moved to Bakersfield, Calif., and eventually found success in its thriving country music scene. In the clubs of Bakersfield, Owens developed a trademark twisted-note style on his solid body Fender Telecaster. Initially recording as lead guitarist for Tommy Collins in 1953 (on "You Better Not Do That") and then singing for the small Pep and Chesterfield labels, Owens landed on Capitol Records in 1957. When his first single for Capitol fizzled, Owens moved to Puyallup, Wash., (a Tacoma suburb) to pursue a radio career. There he met Don Rich (real name Donald Eugene Ulrich), whose high, nasalized harmony vocals would combine with Owens' singing and chugging 2/4 freight train rhythm to make Owens' recordings distinctive. (Rich remained Owens' charismatic right-hand man until he died in a motorcycle accident in 1974.) In 1959, Owens hit with a recording of "Second Fiddle" in the Ray Price "shuffle" style. Later that year, the success of "Under Your Spell Again" led Owens to return to Bakersfield and form a band, the Buckaroos. In 1963, his recording of Johnny Russell's "Act Naturally" stayed at No. 1 ...
  • Cherokee Language Lesson- Thank you Letter Christmas is over, and if you are like me, you might still have a few thank you notes to write-- so here is a helpful Cherokee Language Lesson for "A Thank You, Note" WORDS: Sgi-- thanks or its done goweli-note(paper) doyu-very much gvyalielitsehi- I appreciate you sincerely- hagwadohiyu gvyohiyu Tsasyed- (my name this one is in Giduwa (Keetoowah) Eastern cherokee Dialect (aka Middle dialect) Now you can write a thank you note too! Just replace my name with yours! Has words like "thanks" "I appreciate you" and "I really appreciate you" Or "I appreciate you very much" and close your letter with "Sincerely Yours". Start corresponding in Tsalagi (Cherokee) from now on! remember, the "-hi" at the ends of words is usually only written, not spoken. Also, in the Eastern dialect, (of Big Cove NC) the "tsa--" sounds like "Za" and sometimes the "Tse" has a "Ch"sound to it. Notice the "Gv" is like the French "u" sound as in "lundy"-- in English, it approximates "Sun" "Fun" and "run" sound, but is nasalized. The Eastern (Giduwa) Dialect is spoken on the Qualla in North Carolina, especially in Big Cove. WORDS: Sgi-- thanks or its done goweli-note(paper) doyu-very much gvyalielitsehi- I appreciate you sincerely- hagwadohiyu gvyohiyu Tsasyed- (my name)
  • Open Up Your Heart Buck Billo and Maxi sing "Open Up Your Heart" by Buck Owens. Alvis Edgar Owens Jr. was born in Sherman, Texas, on Aug. 12, 1929, and at age 3 or 4 nicknamed himself "Buck" after a mule on the family farm. The family moved west in 1937, settling in Mesa, Ariz., after their trailer hitch broke in Phoenix. Dropping out of school at 13, he taught himself to play guitar. By 1951, he had moved to Bakersfield, Calif., and eventually found success in its thriving country music scene. In the clubs of Bakersfield, Owens developed a trademark twisted-note style on his solid body Fender Telecaster. Initially recording as lead guitarist for Tommy Collins in 1953 (on "You Better Not Do That") and then singing for the small Pep and Chesterfield labels, Owens landed on Capitol Records in 1957. When his first single for Capitol fizzled, Owens moved to Puyallup, Wash., (a Tacoma suburb) to pursue a radio career. There he met Don Rich (real name Donald Eugene Ulrich), whose high, nasalized harmony vocals would combine with Owens' singing and chugging 2/4 freight train rhythm to make Owens' recordings distinctive. (Rich remained Owens' charismatic right-hand man until he died in a motorcycle accident in 1974.) In 1959, Owens hit with a recording of "Second Fiddle" in the Ray Price "shuffle" style. Later that year, the success of "Under Your Spell Again" led Owens to return to Bakersfield and form a band, the Buckaroos. In 1963, his recording of Johnny Russell's "Act Naturally" stayed at No ...
  • Study Pin Yin iPad ☆☆☆☆☆ A Great way to Learn Chinese PinYin Anywhere. 64 Chinese PinYin Characters with 4 different Categories specially designed for the iPad. This is a totally new Learning Experience. ☆☆☆☆☆ You can learn almost anywhere, Study PinYin has been designed to help you Learn Pin Yin which is the foundation of Chinese. With the fun graphics and easy to use interface you will be speaking fluently in no time. Every Individual Character has an explanation in English and Chinese on how to pronounce the Character. There is also a commonly used word for each Character. There are four different categories per Character. ★Learn it in Words - Gives you 4 Words Using that Character ★Learn to Spell - Listen to the 4 different Tones of Each Character ★Learn it in Sentences - Listen to a complete Sentence, in Chinese and English. ★Tongue Twister - Just for fun try a tongue twister in Chinese and English Features ★Based on the Book, Study PinYin. ★Very Easy User Friendly Interface. ★Packed Full with 64 Characters of Pictures, Text and Sound files. ★Learn Step by Step, Character by Character. ★Simply touch individual Sentences, Words or Pictures and listen to the Chinese or English. ★Excellent and Clear Pronunciation to help you pronounce the 4 Chinese tones. With the Beautiful illustrated graphics these will keep you and your Children captivated and have fun while learning. With the Clear Pronunciation it's like having your very own Chinese Linguistic with you wherever ...
  • Planet Organism Alan Watts talking about nature Om or Aum (also Auṃ, written in Devanāgari as ॐ and as ओम्, in Sanskrit known as praṇava प्रणव [lit. "to sound out loudly"], Omkara, or Auṃkāra (also as Aumkāra) ओंकार (lit. "Auṃ form/syllable"), is a sacred/mystical syllable in the Dharmic or Indian religions, ie Hinduism, Jainism, and Buddhism. Aum is pronounced as a long or over-long nasalized close-mid back rounded vowel, [õːː]), though there are other enunciations adhered to in received traditions. It is placed at the beginning of most Hindu texts as a sacred incantation to be intoned at the beginning and end of a reading of the Vedas or prior to any prayer or mantra. The Māndukya Upanishad is entirely devoted to the explanation of the syllable. The syllable consists of three phonemes, a Vaishvanara, u Hiranyagarbha and m Iswara, which symbolize the beginning, duration, and dissolution of the universe and the associated gods Brahma, Vishnu, and Shiva, respectively. The syllable aum is first described as all-encompassing mystical entity in the Upanishads. Today, in all Hindu art and all over India and Nepal, 'aum' can be seen virtually everywhere, a common sign for Hinduism and its philosophy and theology. Hindus believe that as creation began, the divine, all-encompassing consciousness took the form of the first and original vibration manifesting as sound "AUM". Before creation began it was "Shunyākāsha", the emptiness or the void. Shunyākāsha, meaning literally "no sky ...
  • Kirby Superstar (SNES) Overview Me playing Kirby Superstar and talking about it. By the way I had a cold while making this video so thats why I sound so nasalized.
  • Coneheads Movie Trailer The Coneheads Movie Trailer
  • My EFL Classroom - Warm Ups, the Secret Word The Secret Word This warm up is designed for elementary school students. The basic premise is to choose a vocabulary word the students know and ask them to be the first to stand up when they hear it at any time during the lesson. The creates attention on the teacher and helps sustain student focus throughout the class. USAGE NOTE The word envelope was borrowed into English from French during the early 18th century, and the first syllable acquired the pronunciation (ŏn) as an approximation to the nasalized French pronunciation. Gradually the word has become anglicized further and is now most commonly pronounced (ĕn'və-lōp'). The earlier pronunciation is still considered acceptable, however. A recent survey reveals that the (ŏn'-) pronunciation for the word envelope is used by 30 percent of the Usage Panel and is recognized as an acceptable variant by about 20 percent of those Panelists who normally use the (ĕn'-) pronunciation. Other similar words borrowed from French in the modern period include envoy (17th century), encore, ennui, ensemble, entree (18th century), entourage, and entrepreneur (19th century). Most retain their pseudo-French pronunciations, with the exception of envoy, which, like envelope, is mainly pronounced with (ĕn) now.
  • Bye Bye Birdie (1963 movie) - Telephone Hour Bye Bye Birdie 1963 original movie version of Telephone Hour
  • Crying Time Again Buck Billo and Maxi sing "Crying Time Again" by Buck Owens. Alvis Edgar Owens Jr. was born in Sherman, Texas, on Aug. 12, 1929, and at age 3 or 4 nicknamed himself "Buck" after a mule on the family farm. The family moved west in 1937, settling in Mesa, Ariz., after their trailer hitch broke in Phoenix. Dropping out of school at 13, he taught himself to play guitar. By 1951, he had moved to Bakersfield, Calif., and eventually found success in its thriving country music scene. In the clubs of Bakersfield, Owens developed a trademark twisted-note style on his solid body Fender Telecaster. Initially recording as lead guitarist for Tommy Collins in 1953 (on "You Better Not Do That") and then singing for the small Pep and Chesterfield labels, Owens landed on Capitol Records in 1957. When his first single for Capitol fizzled, Owens moved to Puyallup, Wash., (a Tacoma suburb) to pursue a radio career. There he met Don Rich (real name Donald Eugene Ulrich), whose high, nasalized harmony vocals would combine with Owens' singing and chugging 2/4 freight train rhythm to make Owens' recordings distinctive. (Rich remained Owens' charismatic right-hand man until he died in a motorcycle accident in 1974.) In 1959, Owens hit with a recording of "Second Fiddle" in the Ray Price "shuffle" style. Later that year, the success of "Under Your Spell Again" led Owens to return to Bakersfield and form a band, the Buckaroos. In 1963, his recording of Johnny Russell's "Act Naturally" stayed at No. 1 ...
  • Study PinYin for Mac ☆☆☆☆☆ A Great way to Learn Chinese PinYin Anywhere. 64 Chinese PinYin Characters with 4 different Categories specially designed for the iPhone. This is a totally new Learning Experience. ☆☆☆☆☆ You can learn almost anywhere, Study PinYin has been designed to help you Learn Pin Yin which is the foundation of Chinese. With the fun graphics and easy to use interface you will be speaking fluently in no time. Every Individual Character has an explanation in English and Chinese on how to pronounce the Character. There is also a commonly used word for each Character. There are four different categories per Character. ★Learn it in Words - Gives you 4 Words Using that Character ★Learn to Spell - Listen to the 4 different Tones of Each Character ★Learn it in Sentences - Listen to a complete Sentence, in Chinese and English. ★Tongue Twister - Just for fun try a tongue twister in Chinese and English Features ★Based on the Book, Study PinYin. ★Very Easy User Friendly Interface. ★Packed Full with 64 Characters of Pictures, Text and Sound files. ★Learn Step by Step, Character by Character. ★Simply touch individual Sentences, Words or Pictures and listen to the Chinese or English. ★Excellent and Clear Pronunciation to help you pronounce the 4 Chinese tones. With the Beautiful illustrated graphics these will keep you and your Children captivated and have fun while learning. With the Clear Pronunciation it's like having your very own Chinese Linguistic with you wherever ...
  • Atiff_uk: Atiff_uk: #arynews.. the crowd seem silences apart from the nasalized choor whos talking.. why are they showing this?
  • YumikoooL: YumikoooL: Now I sound so nasalized . Hehehe like Myungsoo ! Oh well that's the only good point .
  • mumtosophia: mumtosophia: How would a chef, footie player, diva & a nasalized singer know about comedy? Am curious on how would they judge professional comedians?

Blogs & Forum
blogs and forums about nasalized

  • “Bienvenue au forum A la française ! This bilingual forum is part of Learn French at About , which offers free resources for students, teachers, and lovers of French. You can chat and ask questions in French about just about anything or in”
    — comment s'appelle-t-il / s'appellent-ils - A la française,

  • “( Formerly at /home/wells/blog.htm.) Thursday, 15 July 2010. French nasalized vowels. My formal learning of French ended at O Level How well combining diacritics fit for any reader on this blog is determined by a number of factors — most of them in that reader's own computer. In”
    — John Wells's phonetic blog: French nasalized vowels, phonetic-

  • “Some accents (Great Lakes accents, NYC-Queens accent) are more nasalized than the others (WestCoast US) To speak good English, forget about nasalized vowels, and just say the vowels and consonants correctly, and any secondary”
    — nasality of vowels | Antimoon Forum,

  • “nc - pre-nasalized c click (don't know when to use which) nch - pre-nasalized "ch" click. ng - breathy-voiced velar (see "g") nasal sonorant, as ng”
    — siSwati - Pronunciation Guide | akcooper's Blog,

  • “vowels are nasalized by an M or and N. Campo, Bento, Pinto, Pomba e Bumba. it is not the letter A nasalized, it is the schwa sound nasalized”
    — EMB - Fórum de Discussões, .br

  • “Hi all:During the month, I have been struggling with looking for a good font for Burmese scripts and In the following lessons you are learning three nasalized vowels. Here is the vowel script { if } "ng_ thaq" which is prounced”
    — Let us learn Burmese language. - Forum - Page 12,

Keywords
related keywords for nasalized

Similar
similar for nasalized