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  • The name Cloudina honors the 20th century geologist and palaeontologist Preston Cloud. Archive • Nominate a palaeontologist •Palaeontologist of the Month. José Fernando Bonaparte (born June 14, 1928), is an Argentine paleontologist who discovered a plethora of South American. — “Fossil Wiki, the palaeontology wiki”,
  • If you want to see some of the most wonderful and plentiful fossils in the world youll have to travel to Seymour Island in Antarctica According to our resident palaeontologist Paul Willis Seymou. — “Science Show - 31/05/2003: Antarctic Dinosaurs”, .au
  • This was a fallacy, as the Bonn palaeontologist, Dr. Martin Sander, recently discovered. The sensational finds were made eight years ago: in September 1998 Holger Luedtke, a hobby palaeontologist came across teeth and other remains of a herbivorous dinosaur in the Langenberg quarry near Oker on. — “Psych Central - Sensational find: The mini-dinosaurs from the”,
  • Working as a palaeontologist at the Royal Tyrrell Museum means that in the span of a year you can go from working in the field prospecting for, and collecting fossils to spending many hours in your lab studying specimens. — “Royal Tyrrell Museum | Research | Our Scientists | Life of a”,
  • We_ ve got nine million fossils in our collection and palaeontologist Andy Ross knows all about them. Find out more about his job and why he loves his work. — “Palaeontologist”,
  • The latest research on dinosaurs and extinction theories and dinosaur fossils from the Telegraph Karolyn Shindler celebrates the achievements of the palaeontologist Barbara Hastings, who was born 200 years ago. — “Dinosaurs latest - Telegraph”,
  • AS you drive from Perth down to your favourite Margaret River winery, you'll pass close to the place where palaeontologist Gavin Prideaux and his team from Adelaide's Flinders University are brushing and scraping their way towards scientific discovery. 5. — “Clipmarks - Palaeontologist Clipmarks”,
  • Learn about The Dinosaur Apatosaurus a member of the Theropoda Group, with . In the early 1900s A famous dinosaur scientist or palaeontologist by the name of Othniel Charles Marsh discovered what he thought were three. — “Apatosaurus - Dinosaurs For Kids - ”,
  • This was a fallacy, as the Bonn palaeontologist, Dr. Martin Sander, recently discovered. The palaeontologist Thomas Laven made a detailed study of 'Hanna's' skull: it is the only skull of a sauropod dinosaur to be hitherto found in Europe. — “The Mini-Dinosaurs From The Harz Mountains”,
  • Encyclopedia article about palaeontologist. Information about palaeontologist in the Columbia Encyclopedia, Computer Desktop Encyclopedia, computing dictionary. palaeontologists. — “palaeontologist definition of palaeontologist in the Free”, encyclopedia2
  • Palaeontologist - Dictionary Definition and Overview. Palaeontologist : (noun) 1: a specialist in paleontology [syn: paleontologist, fossilist]. — “Palaeontologist - Define Palaeontologist at WordIQ Online”,
  • Definition of palaeontologist in the Online Dictionary. Meaning of palaeontologist. Pronunciation of palaeontologist. Translations of palaeontologist. palaeontologist synonyms, palaeontologist antonyms. Information about palaeontologist in the. — “palaeontologist - definition of palaeontologist by the Free”,
  • Retrieved from "http:///wiki/palaeontologist" This page was last modified on 27 August 2009, at 10:28. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License; additional. — “palaeontologist - Wiktionary”,
  • We found 13 dictionaries with English definitions that include the word palaeontologist: first link on a line below to go directly to a page where "palaeontologist" is defined. — “Definitions of palaeontologist - OneLook Dictionary Search”,
  • 24 Hour Shipping on most orders. Half Palaeontologist Half Cage Fighter Tshirt created by jobshirt. This design is available on many sizes, styles, and colors of shirts. — “Half Palaeontologist Half Cage Fighter Tshirt from ”,
  • Things may need to know as a Palaeontologist. Palaeontology is the study of ancient animal and environment records. The vary in salaries is due to some palaeontologists working on contracts and some of them working for big museums. — “palaeontologist”,
  • Paleontology investigates the entire history of life on Earth. A paleontologist at work The preparation of the fossilized bones of Europasaurus holgeri. — “Paleontology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • As a palaeontologist myself, I am much occupied with the philosophical problems of identifying ancestral forms in the fossil record. Personal letter (written 10 April 1979) from Dr. Colin Patterson, Senior Palaeontologist at the British Museum of Natural History in London, to Luther D. Sunderland; as. — “Beginnings 8”,
  • Buy merchandise to support the Ethical Palaeontologist - all your favourite quotes here!. — “The Ethical Palaeontologist Shop : The Ethical”,
  • Palaeontologist Richard Forrest explains why the T. rex was a kitten compared with this monster David Martill, a palaeontologist from the University of Portsmouth, said: "These creatures were monsters. — “BBC NEWS | Science & Environment | Colossal 'sea monster”,
  • Note: click on a word meaning below to see its connections and related words. The noun palaeontologist has one meaning: Meaning #1 : a specialist in. — “palaeontologist: Information from ”,

Videos
related videos for palaeontologist

  • Human Journey 2/5 Asia (1/6) 2. Asia In the second episode, Roberts travels to Siberia and visits an isolated community of indigenous people who still practice reindeer hunting. With reference to them, she asks how ancient Africans could have adapted to the hostile climate of northern Asia, and why Asian people look so different from Africans. Roberts then explores an alternative to the Out of Africa theory, the multiregional hypothesis that has gained support in some scientific communities in China. According to this theory, the Chinese are descended from a human species called Homo erectus rather than from the Homo sapiens from which the rest of humanity evolved. Roberts visits the Zhoukoudian caves, in which Peking Man, the supposed Homo erectus ancestor of the Chinese, was discovered. Roberts notes that some Chinese anthropologists and palaeontologists have shown modern Chinese physical characteristics in the fossil skulls, such as broad cheek bones, cranial skull shape and shovel-shaped incisors that are absent in almost all other humans. She also notes that the stone tools found in China seem more primitive than those elsewhere, and infers that they were made exclusively by Homo erectus. However, she argues that the skull evidence is only subtle. She interviews an American palaeontologist, who presents his hypothesis that the ancient Chinese humans used bamboo instead of stone, explaining the absence of sophisticated stone tools, despite the absence of archaeological evidence to support this ...
  • Foot Soldiers of Palaeontology (teaser) SYNOPSIS Foot Soldiers of Paleontology - a film about the modern day Indiana Jones's of the Palaeontology world. Since the first dinosaur fossil discovery, the world has been fascinated with dinosaurs. 95% of all new fossil discoveries are made by the Foot Soldiers of Palaeontology. Call them dinosaur hunters or fossil collectors or amateur paleos - they are the modern day Indiana Jones's of the Palaeontology world. Adventure seekers, obsessed with fossils. This film is about 3 of Australia's most prolific Fossil Foot Soldiers - Fossil Collectors Tom and Sharon Hurley and Dinosaur Dick Suter. You haven't heard of these people before because Fossil Foot Soldiers have little voice in the Palaeontology world - they do the hard yards, while scientists get most of the glory. Fossil Foot Soldiers are the unsung heroes of Palaeontology - and in this film they share their secrets, knowledge and lifelong fascination with fossils. This one hour TV documentary is currently in production and requires broadcaster interest. CONTACT Director/Co-Producer: Kim Mavromatis (MAV Media) .au EMAIL: [email protected] Co-Producer: Carlos Alperin (Galloping Films) EMAIL: [email protected] CENTRAL CHARACTERS Tom and Sharon Hurley Dinosaur Dick Suter ANIMATION Froling Enterprises, Lead Artist Stuart Nankivell (.au)
  • Dromaeosaurus - Short Palaeo episode Dromaeosaurus was one of the requests for a episode, so here it is!
  • Palaeontologist, David Unwin on Flying Monsters 3D.mov David Unwin, Palaeontologist from the University of Leicester, on Flying Monsters 3D with David Attenborough.
  • ROM Research: Dinosaurs in Alberta's Badlands Follow Dr. David Evans, Associate Curator of Vertebrate Palaeontology at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, during his field work in Alberta's Badlands and discover what a palaeontologist job really involves.
  • Palaeontologist Gareth Gareth's first dinosaur presentation.
  • Bone Of Contention 1 of 5 - Dr.Quinn A palaeontologist comes to Colorado and puts up a reward for everyone who can help him find dinosaurbones.
  • Dinosaur Ryan - Fossil talk with Palaeontologist, Dean Lomax Here is a segment of the "Dinosaur Ryan: Special Episode", where I ask palaeontologist Dean Lomax on his opinions of some fossils in my collection in the Doncaster museum. Fossils are examples of Spinosaurs, Tyrannosaurus Rex, Allosaurus, Triceratops and some unknown fossils. Enjoy!
  • Robert Jones Masterclass Robert Jones is a palaeontologist at the Australian Museum. In this masterclass he answers questions about the fossils of Gondwana and Australian fossils in general.
  • Stones Rocks Mineral places to hunt In UsA 215 651 8329 Discovering Fossils combines the latest scientific knowledge and fieldwork to create a continually up-to-date library of resources. The study of the prehistoric world provides a lifelong interest that is as variable in discoveries as it is dramatic in length of time. From the initial building blocks of life to the birth of plants, insects, dinosaurs and even mankind, the science of palaeontology leaves no stone unturned. The initial study of palaeontology soon grows into a fascinating range of practical and mental challenges that enrich and enthuse the individual. Fossils inspire the individual to consider prehistoric life in the context of former environments and appreciate how global events have shaped the modern world. Like the pages of a book, the fossil record provides a storyboard of dramatic changes in the earth's history, each period leaving its own unique legacy in the rocks. From this evidence the palaeontologist can form an understanding of a truly amazing prehistoric world.
  • Macro Evolution in the Deep Sea pt 6 of 7 SEILACHER SPEAKS ON MACRO EVOLUTION ON NOV 13 Dolf Seilacher will visit the University of Cincinnati Geology Department and present a lecture titled "Macro evolution in the Deep Sea" at 3:30 PM On Friday November 13, 2009, in Room 201 in Braunstein Hall. The lecture is in conjunction with UC's Darwin Year activities. The lecture will be followed by a reception. Carl Brett has invited the Dry Dredgers to attend. Professor Seilacher is originally from Swabia, southern Germany, and teaches part of the year at Tübingen, Germany and part at Yale University. "As a famous geologist and paleontologist, he is arguably the most celebrated member of that profession in all of Europe and widely recognized as one of the leading paleontologists in the world," Brett said. "A few years back Dolf received the Crawford Prize from the King of Norway-which is essentially the equivalent of the Nobel Prize in geology. He is also an engaging speaker and a very interesting person." The lecture, Brett said, "is bound to be entertaining, intriguing and provocative." In awarding Seilacher with its 2006 Lapworth Medal, the UK-based Palaeontological Association gave this summary: "Prof. Dolf Seilacher is one of the world's most renowned invertebrate palaeontologists, widely celebrated for his visionary and inspired interpretations of the fossil record. He has made his most significant contributions to four areas of palaeontology: trace fossils, morphodynamics, the study of exceptionally preserved ...
  • Zack Mansell, Palaeontologist Zack Mansell, my nephew is two years old and recognises over thirty different dinosaurs. He only has to see a picture a few times to memorise them. Apparently some toddlers naturally have a near photographic memory. We noticed he could do this after he started identifying all of the sharks in one of his books. He is not reading the cards - he's only two and can't read. Zack is sorry if the pronunciation is a bit wrong - we had problems reading some of the less well known dinosaurs.
  • Dinosaur Ryan: Special Episode In this special Episode, I go on a quest to find out more about palaeontology. Some of the images in this video were taken in the Doncaster museum and art gallery, where I also met palaeontologist, Dean Lomax.
  • Macro Evolution in the Deep Sea pt 2 of 7 SEILACHER SPEAKS ON MACRO EVOLUTION ON NOV 13 Dolf Seilacher will visit the University of Cincinnati Geology Department and present a lecture titled "Macro evolution in the Deep Sea" at 3:30 PM On Friday November 13, 2009, in Room 201 in Braunstein Hall. The lecture is in conjunction with UC's Darwin Year activities. The lecture will be followed by a reception. Carl Brett has invited the Dry Dredgers to attend. Professor Seilacher is originally from Swabia, southern Germany, and teaches part of the year at Tübingen, Germany and part at Yale University. "As a famous geologist and paleontologist, he is arguably the most celebrated member of that profession in all of Europe and widely recognized as one of the leading paleontologists in the world," Brett said. "A few years back Dolf received the Crawford Prize from the King of Norway-which is essentially the equivalent of the Nobel Prize in geology. He is also an engaging speaker and a very interesting person." The lecture, Brett said, "is bound to be entertaining, intriguing and provocative." In awarding Seilacher with its 2006 Lapworth Medal, the UK-based Palaeontological Association gave this summary: "Prof. Dolf Seilacher is one of the world's most renowned invertebrate palaeontologists, widely celebrated for his visionary and inspired interpretations of the fossil record. He has made his most significant contributions to four areas of palaeontology: trace fossils, morphodynamics, the study of exceptionally preserved ...
  • Chasmosaurus Irvinensis Chasmosaurus irvinensis is a new species of horned dinosaur, whose true identity was unmasked at the Canadian Museum of Nature by a diligent team of researchers. Both the skeleton and a life-like recreation featuring Chasmosaurus irvinensis are featured in the Museum's Talisman Energy Fossil Gallery. The skeleton was discovered in 1958 by American palaeontologist Wann Langston near Irvine, Alberta. Langston believed that the dinosaur belonged to a species known as Chasmosaurus belli because it had a small nose horn and brow horns. In the 1990s, Dr. Robert Holmes, a palaeontologist (nature.ca ) at the Canadian Museum of Nature, began looking at the specimens collected from Langston's dig. He realized that the skull of this horned dinosaur did not entirely match that of the belli species. This dinosaur was different in that it had large openings or chasms in the frill of its skull. This physical attribute led Holmes and other researchers to further study the skeleton and they determined that this was a new species of Chasmosaurus. Chasmosaurus irvinensis lived about 72 million years ago. It was a herbivore. Like many plant-eating dinosaurs it travelled in herds, primarily as protection against meat-eating predators. Though Chasmosaurus irvinensis is not one of the larger dinosaurs, its weight is over four tons and it measures an impressive three metres long - with its tail adding another two metres! This unique dinosaur, first discovered here in Canada, is a testament to ...
  • Disc Ch Fearless Planet S01E04: Sahara ¦ 480p [1/3] Part 4: Sahara Where would you find the biggest dinosaur ever? The oldest glass in the world? A cave so precious it changed history? In the same place where you can fly forever, ski at 58 degrees Celsius (136 degrees Fahrenheit) and drink million-year-old water. The Sahara Desert provides unique challenges. Rock climbing in the extreme heat with geologist Matt Genge, Will Gadd discovers the ancient history of a lost superdesert. While Matt Genge and palaeontologist Matt Lamanna explore the eastern side of the Sahara, Gadd's journey takes him south, deep into the western side. Between them, they discover a world of deserts, savannas and oceans, and Gadd uses the extreme heat to try and reach the Holy Grail of paragliding — never-ending lift. He finds a new way to cross the oceans of sand and discovers what happened to the lost waters that once made this ultradry world a lush, beautiful land. The program offers an exclusive view of 12000-year-old cave paintings previously seen by only handful of people in the world. We uncover previously unseen evidence of a massive meteorite strike. It is now estimated that the rock that slammed into the Sahara was half a mile wide.
  • Key Transitional fossil discovered READ DESCRIPTION. Long-sought fossil mammal with transitional middle ear found in China. Palaeontologists have announced the discovery of Liaoconodon hui, a complete fossil mammal from the Mesozoic found in China that includes the long-sought transitional middle ear. The specimen was found by palaeontologists from the American Museum of Natural History and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. It shows the bones associated with hearing in mammals, the malleus, incus, and ectotympanic, decoupled from the lower jaw, as had been predicted, but were held in place by an ossified cartilage that rested in a groove on the lower jaw. People have been looking for this specimen for over 150 years since noticing a puzzling groove on the lower jaw of some early mammals," Jin Meng, curator in the Division of Palaeontology at the Museum and first author of the paper, said. "Now we have cartilage with ear bones attached, the first clear paleontological evidence showing relationships between the lower jaw and middle ear," Meng revealed The transition from reptiles to mammals has long been an open question, although studies of developing embryos have linked reptilian bones of the lower jaw joint to mammalian middle ear bones. The new fossil, Liaoconodon hui, fills the gap in knowledge between the basal, early mammaliaforms like Morganucodon, where the middle ear bones are part of the mandible and the definitive middle ear of living and fossil mammals. Liaoconodon hui is a medium-sized mammal ...
  • Extreme Dinosaurs - The Giants of Patagonia - Part 1 Amazing new discoveries in South America are revolutionising what we thought we knew about the dinosaur world. It now seems that South America was home to both the largest meat-eater - so new it's still without a name - and the largest herbivore - the enormous long-necked Argentinasaurus. And what's more, these dinosaurs lived at the same time in the same place. So it's possible that like in a science fiction movie, in this prehistoric world these two giants of their kind fought each other in a spectacular clash of the Titans. Horizon follows the scientists to Argentina as they unearth one of these giants - a brand new species of dinosaur; the biggest carnivore ever discovered. Not yet named, this new creature is even bigger than T. rex, the so-called 'king' of the carnivores. The new giant South American predator had a skull bigger than a man that was full of serrated, knife-like teeth and long powerful jaw muscles. They could dissect their prey with almost surgical precision. But even this formidable killing machine couldn't alone have taken on the massive long-neck, Argentinasaurus, which was the height of a five-storey building. It must have hunted in a pack. The problem is, the mega-meat-eaters have always been assumed to have been solitary creatures. The evidence shows that they lived and hunted alone. If they weren't pack hunters, then they would never have attacked Argentinasaurus. So it looked like the idea of a mighty battle between these two giants was simply ...
  • Fossil Ida's 'father' defends the media hype Read more at Jørn Hurum, the University of Oslo palaeontologist who is Ida's champion and who named the specimen after his daughter, says few words about the acquisition of the fossil and how pleased he was to have David Attenborough narrate the documentary.
  • Disc Ch Fearless Planet S01E04: Sahara ¦ 480p [3/3] Part 4: Sahara Where would you find the biggest dinosaur ever? The oldest glass in the world? A cave so precious it changed history? In the same place where you can fly forever, ski at 58 degrees Celsius (136 degrees Fahrenheit) and drink million-year-old water. The Sahara Desert provides unique challenges. Rock climbing in the extreme heat with geologist Matt Genge, Will Gadd discovers the ancient history of a lost superdesert. While Matt Genge and palaeontologist Matt Lamanna explore the eastern side of the Sahara, Gadd's journey takes him south, deep into the western side. Between them, they discover a world of deserts, savannas and oceans, and Gadd uses the extreme heat to try and reach the Holy Grail of paragliding — never-ending lift. He finds a new way to cross the oceans of sand and discovers what happened to the lost waters that once made this ultradry world a lush, beautiful land. The program offers an exclusive view of 12000-year-old cave paintings previously seen by only handful of people in the world. We uncover previously unseen evidence of a massive meteorite strike. It is now estimated that the rock that slammed into the Sahara was half a mile wide.
  • Macro Evolution in the Deep Sea pt 4 of 7 SEILACHER SPEAKS ON MACRO EVOLUTION ON NOV 13 Dolf Seilacher will visit the University of Cincinnati Geology Department and present a lecture titled "Macro evolution in the Deep Sea" at 3:30 PM On Friday November 13, 2009, in Room 201 in Braunstein Hall. The lecture is in conjunction with UC's Darwin Year activities. The lecture will be followed by a reception. Carl Brett has invited the Dry Dredgers to attend. Professor Seilacher is originally from Swabia, southern Germany, and teaches part of the year at Tübingen, Germany and part at Yale University. "As a famous geologist and paleontologist, he is arguably the most celebrated member of that profession in all of Europe and widely recognized as one of the leading paleontologists in the world," Brett said. "A few years back Dolf received the Crawford Prize from the King of Norway-which is essentially the equivalent of the Nobel Prize in geology. He is also an engaging speaker and a very interesting person." The lecture, Brett said, "is bound to be entertaining, intriguing and provocative." In awarding Seilacher with its 2006 Lapworth Medal, the UK-based Palaeontological Association gave this summary: "Prof. Dolf Seilacher is one of the world's most renowned invertebrate palaeontologists, widely celebrated for his visionary and inspired interpretations of the fossil record. He has made his most significant contributions to four areas of palaeontology: trace fossils, morphodynamics, the study of exceptionally preserved ...
  • Big Kills, Big Killers This video was created for the Melbourne Museum to promote talks being held by palaeontologists. A contemporary approach was adopted to attract a younger audience to these events. Medialight Studios produced the video from script editing, filming, video editing and authouing.
  • Neanderthal Episode 1 Discovery Channel Part 1/4 HD Playlist All 4 Parts Neanderthal Please subscribe to Youtube channel WhyEvolutionIsTrue for more documentaries on evolution. Discovery Channel Neanderthal Long ago, two species of human beings coexisted on Earth until competition drove one of them to extinction. This program, set in the southwest of France 35000 years ago, uses re-creations of cinematic proportions to reconstruct life in the Neanderthal world at the time Cro-Magnons first entered the scene. All aspects of Neanderthal clan life are examined, including tool- and weapon-making, hunting and gathering, health and healing, childbirth, rituals, and making fire. Footage of skeletal remains and the scholarly research of eminent palaeontologist Chris Stringer and Oxford University's Paul Pettitt support the documentary.
  • Extreme Dinosaurs - The Giants of Patagonia - Part 5 Amazing new discoveries in South America are revolutionising what we thought we knew about the dinosaur world. It now seems that South America was home to both the largest meat-eater - so new it's still without a name - and the largest herbivore - the enormous long-necked Argentinasaurus. And what's more, these dinosaurs lived at the same time in the same place. So it's possible that like in a science fiction movie, in this prehistoric world these two giants of their kind fought each other in a spectacular clash of the Titans. Horizon follows the scientists to Argentina as they unearth one of these giants - a brand new species of dinosaur; the biggest carnivore ever discovered. Not yet named, this new creature is even bigger than T. rex, the so-called 'king' of the carnivores. The new giant South American predator had a skull bigger than a man that was full of serrated, knife-like teeth and long powerful jaw muscles. They could dissect their prey with almost surgical precision. But even this formidable killing machine couldn't alone have taken on the massive long-neck, Argentinasaurus, which was the height of a five-storey building. It must have hunted in a pack. The problem is, the mega-meat-eaters have always been assumed to have been solitary creatures. The evidence shows that they lived and hunted alone. If they weren't pack hunters, then they would never have attacked Argentinasaurus. So it looked like the idea of a mighty battle between these two giants was simply ...
  • Extreme Dinosaurs - The Giants of Patagonia - Part 4 Amazing new discoveries in South America are revolutionising what we thought we knew about the dinosaur world. It now seems that South America was home to both the largest meat-eater - so new it's still without a name - and the largest herbivore - the enormous long-necked Argentinasaurus. And what's more, these dinosaurs lived at the same time in the same place. So it's possible that like in a science fiction movie, in this prehistoric world these two giants of their kind fought each other in a spectacular clash of the Titans. Horizon follows the scientists to Argentina as they unearth one of these giants - a brand new species of dinosaur; the biggest carnivore ever discovered. Not yet named, this new creature is even bigger than T. rex, the so-called 'king' of the carnivores. The new giant South American predator had a skull bigger than a man that was full of serrated, knife-like teeth and long powerful jaw muscles. They could dissect their prey with almost surgical precision. But even this formidable killing machine couldn't alone have taken on the massive long-neck, Argentinasaurus, which was the height of a five-storey building. It must have hunted in a pack. The problem is, the mega-meat-eaters have always been assumed to have been solitary creatures. The evidence shows that they lived and hunted alone. If they weren't pack hunters, then they would never have attacked Argentinasaurus. So it looked like the idea of a mighty battle between these two giants was simply ...
  • Dinosaur dental work - Extreme Dinosaurs - BBC Palaeontologist Phil Currie uncovers amazing facts about the mega-dinosaur's teeth and eating habits, showing that a clash of the titans really did occur. Great animated reconstructions from the fascinating BBC documentary Extreme Dinosaurs. Watch more high quality videos on the Explore YouTube channel from BBC Worldwide here:
  • Macro Evolution in the Deep Sea pt .5 of 7 SEILACHER SPEAKS ON MACRO EVOLUTION ON NOV 13 Dolf Seilacher will visit the University of Cincinnati Geology Department and present a lecture titled "Macro evolution in the Deep Sea" at 3:30 PM On Friday November 13, 2009, in Room 201 in Braunstein Hall. The lecture is in conjunction with UC's Darwin Year activities. The lecture will be followed by a reception. Carl Brett has invited the Dry Dredgers to attend. Professor Seilacher is originally from Swabia, southern Germany, and teaches part of the year at Tübingen, Germany and part at Yale University. "As a famous geologist and paleontologist, he is arguably the most celebrated member of that profession in all of Europe and widely recognized as one of the leading paleontologists in the world," Brett said. "A few years back Dolf received the Crawford Prize from the King of Norway-which is essentially the equivalent of the Nobel Prize in geology. He is also an engaging speaker and a very interesting person." The lecture, Brett said, "is bound to be entertaining, intriguing and provocative." In awarding Seilacher with its 2006 Lapworth Medal, the UK-based Palaeontological Association gave this summary: "Prof. Dolf Seilacher is one of the world's most renowned invertebrate palaeontologists, widely celebrated for his visionary and inspired interpretations of the fossil record. He has made his most significant contributions to four areas of palaeontology: trace fossils, morphodynamics, the study of exceptionally preserved ...
  • The Seventy Great Mysteries of the Natural World: Interview with the author What do we really know about the functioning of the Earth and of life? What do we still have to learn? In this new book published by Thames & Hudson, more than sixty eminent scientists from all over the world give us privileged insights into their cutting-edge research and findings. Journey from the core of the Earth to the top of Mount Everest, from microbes living without oxygen in the deepest oceans to the remarkable ways in which bees communicate. Investigate the secrets of animal movement and migration, the rigours of life in the desert and how many species there may be in existence. Michael J. Benton is Professor of Vertebrate Palaeontology and was formerly Head of the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Bristol. He has written over 180 scientific articles and over 50 books, many of them standard reference works and textbooks, as well as popular books about dinosaurs and the history of life, including 'When Life Nearly Died', published by Thames & Hudson.
  • Dinosaur Ryan - Psittacosaurus Fact file Here is a video fact file on the dinosaur, Psitacosaurus. For it's size, palaeontologist know a lot about this dinosaur than any other such as behaviour, biology and the ecosystems it lived in. If you have any questions/ ideas/ suggestions for me, send them to: [email protected] -Enjoy!
  • Hunting in packs - Extreme Dinosaurs - BBC Palaeontologist Phil Currie discovers that the huge carnivorous dinosaurs found in South America hunted in packs, making them more of a match for the Argentinasaurus. Clip from the BBC documentary Extreme Dinosaurs. Watch more high quality videos on the Explore YouTube channel from BBC Worldwide here:
  • Extreme Dinosaurs - The Giants of Patagonia - Part 2 Amazing new discoveries in South America are revolutionising what we thought we knew about the dinosaur world. It now seems that South America was home to both the largest meat-eater - so new it's still without a name - and the largest herbivore - the enormous long-necked Argentinasaurus. And what's more, these dinosaurs lived at the same time in the same place. So it's possible that like in a science fiction movie, in this prehistoric world these two giants of their kind fought each other in a spectacular clash of the Titans. Horizon follows the scientists to Argentina as they unearth one of these giants - a brand new species of dinosaur; the biggest carnivore ever discovered. Not yet named, this new creature is even bigger than T. rex, the so-called 'king' of the carnivores. The new giant South American predator had a skull bigger than a man that was full of serrated, knife-like teeth and long powerful jaw muscles. They could dissect their prey with almost surgical precision. But even this formidable killing machine couldn't alone have taken on the massive long-neck, Argentinasaurus, which was the height of a five-storey building. It must have hunted in a pack. The problem is, the mega-meat-eaters have always been assumed to have been solitary creatures. The evidence shows that they lived and hunted alone. If they weren't pack hunters, then they would never have attacked Argentinasaurus. So it looked like the idea of a mighty battle between these two giants was simply ...
  • Palaeontologist Gareth 2
  • Macro Evolution in the Deep Sea pt .1 of 7 SEILACHER SPEAKS ON MACRO EVOLUTION ON NOV 13 Dolf Seilacher will visit the University of Cincinnati Geology Department and present a lecture titled "Macro evolution in the Deep Sea" at 3:30 PM On Friday November 13, 2009, in Room 201 in Braunstein Hall. The lecture is in conjunction with UC's Darwin Year activities. The lecture will be followed by a reception. Carl Brett has invited the Dry Dredgers to attend. Professor Seilacher is originally from Swabia, southern Germany, and teaches part of the year at Tübingen, Germany and part at Yale University. "As a famous geologist and paleontologist, he is arguably the most celebrated member of that profession in all of Europe and widely recognized as one of the leading paleontologists in the world," Brett said. "A few years back Dolf received the Crawford Prize from the King of Norway-which is essentially the equivalent of the Nobel Prize in geology. He is also an engaging speaker and a very interesting person." The lecture, Brett said, "is bound to be entertaining, intriguing and provocative." In awarding Seilacher with its 2006 Lapworth Medal, the UK-based Palaeontological Association gave this summary: "Prof. Dolf Seilacher is one of the world's most renowned invertebrate palaeontologists, widely celebrated for his visionary and inspired interpretations of the fossil record. He has made his most significant contributions to four areas of palaeontology: trace fossils, morphodynamics, the study of exceptionally preserved ...
  • Disc Ch Fearless Planet S01E04: Sahara ¦ 480p [2/3] Part 4: Sahara Where would you find the biggest dinosaur ever? The oldest glass in the world? A cave so precious it changed history? In the same place where you can fly forever, ski at 58 degrees Celsius (136 degrees Fahrenheit) and drink million-year-old water. The Sahara Desert provides unique challenges. Rock climbing in the extreme heat with geologist Matt Genge, Will Gadd discovers the ancient history of a lost superdesert. While Matt Genge and palaeontologist Matt Lamanna explore the eastern side of the Sahara, Gadd's journey takes him south, deep into the western side. Between them, they discover a world of deserts, savannas and oceans, and Gadd uses the extreme heat to try and reach the Holy Grail of paragliding — never-ending lift. He finds a new way to cross the oceans of sand and discovers what happened to the lost waters that once made this ultradry world a lush, beautiful land. The program offers an exclusive view of 12000-year-old cave paintings previously seen by only handful of people in the world. We uncover previously unseen evidence of a massive meteorite strike. It is now estimated that the rock that slammed into the Sahara was half a mile wide.
  • I am a Palaeontologist - Royal Tyrrell Museum A new version of the hit song "I am a Palaeontologist" re-written exclusively for the Royal Tyrrell Museum. Enjoy!
  • "'oldest" dinosaur footprints discovered In Bolivia, archaeologists have just discovered the 'oldest' dinosaur footprints in the southern hemisphere. The treasure chest of dinosaur footprints date back to 140 million years ago. STORY: High up in the southern-central region of Bolivia, the Argentine exploration team found over 300 dinosaur tracks. Palaeontologist Pablo Gallina said the team's first day at the site was more than exciting. [Pablo Gallina, Palaeontologist]: "When I stooped down to look at the prints, the other palaeontologists were 50 meters ahead and saying 'There's more here!' And above that there were more prints covering 30 meters with 50 or 60 steps all in a line. It was the traces of prints from an adult dinosaur with its babies. It was more than we could believe." Local farmer Primo Rivera played a significant role in this discovery. [Primo Rivera, Local Farmer]: "I have been looking at these prints ever since I was little. And then I went to the city of Sucre and saw the dinosaur prints in the Cal Orcko exhibition and then I realized that these were prints too." The team says dozens of dinosaurs rare to the area made the prints. One of them appears to be an Ankylosaurus. Evidence of this animal has never been found before in the southern hemisphere. [Sebastian Apesteguia, Palaeontologist]: "The site has preserved traces that are 70 million years older than the ones previously found. They are about 140 million years old and are from dinosaurs living during the Jurassic or Cetacean Periods ...
  • Bruce Hungerford plays Chopin Etude F minor Op. Posth. Bruce Hungerford (24 November 1922 -- 26 January 1977) was a pianist born in Korumburra, Victoria, Australia. Hungerford studied piano with Ignaz Friedman in Sydney 1944. His playing impressed the conductor Eugene Ormandy who suggested he study with Olga Samaroff in Philadelphia. He also received coaching and advice from Myra Hess, who suggested he study with Carl Friedberg in whom he finally found a teacher who suited him. In 1967, Hungerford was approached by Maynard and Seymour Solomon, the founders and directors of the Vanguard Recording Society, to record the complete piano works of Beethoven. Hungerford moved to the United States, and combined a reduced concert schedule with a teaching appointment in Mannes College of Music. The projected recording project was to remain incomplete. Hungerford was killed in a road accident on 26 January 1977 in New York City at the age of 54. He left a legacy of nine all-Beethoven records and one record each of works by Brahms, Chopin, and Schubert on the Vanguard label. In addition to his musical accomplishments, Hungerford was a keen palaeontologist, and studied vertebrate palaeontology at Columbia University and at the Museum of Natural History in New York. He also had a passionate interest in Egyptology. This, and his skill as a photographer, led to his making six research trips to Egypt, the first in 1961 as still photographer on the NBC River Nile Expedition. (source: Wikipedia)
  • Dinosaur Ryan - Video blog #2 In this blog, I talk about what has been happening lately and what the paleo episodes will be like over the next few weeks. I might also be busy on some weeks and so there might not be a new video every friday.
  • Macro Evolution in the Deep Sea pt 7 of 7 Q&A SEILACHER SPEAKS ON MACRO EVOLUTION ON NOV 13 Dolf Seilacher will visit the University of Cincinnati Geology Department and present a lecture titled "Macro evolution in the Deep Sea" at 3:30 PM On Friday November 13, 2009, in Room 201 in Braunstein Hall. The lecture is in conjunction with UC's Darwin Year activities. The lecture will be followed by a reception. Carl Brett has invited the Dry Dredgers to attend. Professor Seilacher is originally from Swabia, southern Germany, and teaches part of the year at Tübingen, Germany and part at Yale University. "As a famous geologist and paleontologist, he is arguably the most celebrated member of that profession in all of Europe and widely recognized as one of the leading paleontologists in the world," Brett said. "A few years back Dolf received the Crawford Prize from the King of Norway-which is essentially the equivalent of the Nobel Prize in geology. He is also an engaging speaker and a very interesting person." The lecture, Brett said, "is bound to be entertaining, intriguing and provocative." In awarding Seilacher with its 2006 Lapworth Medal, the UK-based Palaeontological Association gave this summary: "Prof. Dolf Seilacher is one of the world's most renowned invertebrate palaeontologists, widely celebrated for his visionary and inspired interpretations of the fossil record. He has made his most significant contributions to four areas of palaeontology: trace fossils, morphodynamics, the study of exceptionally preserved ...
  • Extreme Dinosaurs - The Giants of Patagonia - Part 3 Amazing new discoveries in South America are revolutionising what we thought we knew about the dinosaur world. It now seems that South America was home to both the largest meat-eater - so new it's still without a name - and the largest herbivore - the enormous long-necked Argentinasaurus. And what's more, these dinosaurs lived at the same time in the same place. So it's possible that like in a science fiction movie, in this prehistoric world these two giants of their kind fought each other in a spectacular clash of the Titans. Horizon follows the scientists to Argentina as they unearth one of these giants - a brand new species of dinosaur; the biggest carnivore ever discovered. Not yet named, this new creature is even bigger than T. rex, the so-called 'king' of the carnivores. The new giant South American predator had a skull bigger than a man that was full of serrated, knife-like teeth and long powerful jaw muscles. They could dissect their prey with almost surgical precision. But even this formidable killing machine couldn't alone have taken on the massive long-neck, Argentinasaurus, which was the height of a five-storey building. It must have hunted in a pack. The problem is, the mega-meat-eaters have always been assumed to have been solitary creatures. The evidence shows that they lived and hunted alone. If they weren't pack hunters, then they would never have attacked Argentinasaurus. So it looked like the idea of a mighty battle between these two giants was simply ...
  • Macro Evolution in the Deep Sea pt . 3 of 7 SEILACHER SPEAKS ON MACRO EVOLUTION ON NOV 13 Dolf Seilacher will visit the University of Cincinnati Geology Department and present a lecture titled "Macro evolution in the Deep Sea" at 3:30 PM On Friday November 13, 2009, in Room 201 in Braunstein Hall. The lecture is in conjunction with UC's Darwin Year activities. The lecture will be followed by a reception. Carl Brett has invited the Dry Dredgers to attend. Professor Seilacher is originally from Swabia, southern Germany, and teaches part of the year at Tübingen, Germany and part at Yale University. "As a famous geologist and paleontologist, he is arguably the most celebrated member of that profession in all of Europe and widely recognized as one of the leading paleontologists in the world," Brett said. "A few years back Dolf received the Crawford Prize from the King of Norway-which is essentially the equivalent of the Nobel Prize in geology. He is also an engaging speaker and a very interesting person." The lecture, Brett said, "is bound to be entertaining, intriguing and provocative." In awarding Seilacher with its 2006 Lapworth Medal, the UK-based Palaeontological Association gave this summary: "Prof. Dolf Seilacher is one of the world's most renowned invertebrate palaeontologists, widely celebrated for his visionary and inspired interpretations of the fossil record. He has made his most significant contributions to four areas of palaeontology: trace fossils, morphodynamics, the study of exceptionally preserved ...
  • EmmaBBerry: I am beginning to seriously regret not becoming a palaeontologist
  • maggi_cube: RT"@SohnaRox: Barbie has had more than 80 careers, from rock star to palaeontologist to presidential candidate. #DidYouKnow"
  • SohnaRox: Barbie has had more than 80 careers, from rock star to palaeontologist to presidential candidate. #DidYouKnow
  • GouchRobinson: Eating cookie dough ice cream makes me feel like I'm a palaeontologist.
  • CurrieMuseum: Dr. Phil Bell, our palaeontologist, will be giving a talk this weekend at the 9th British Columbia Palaeontological Alliance Symposium.
  • adamatsya: The palaeontologist narrator from the Walking with Dinosaurs show is called "Huxley". Cute. http:///3c3pp7r
  • tooqwk4u: #atheist Dr Willem Ouweneel, Ph.D. Genetic Biologist, Dr Gary Parker, Ph.D. Biologist/Palaeontologist, neither accepts evolutionary THEORY!
  • tooqwk4u: @atheist Niles Eldredge Ph.D. Palaeontologist & Evolutionist "The only competing explanation 4 the complex order we C is Special Creation!"
  • Smoresora: @MomochiZabuza LOL. Awww. Dude. Since I was five I wanted to be a palaeontologist. :P
  • tvtropes: TroperTales: Somewhere A Palaeontologist Is Crying http://bit.ly/k2IY2m

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  • “Junior Palaeontologist Send off.(or Nostalgia) August 8th, 2009 Jehad Leave a comment Go to comments From Project Exploration's Student Blog this is JJBroder, have fun JP's and may you continue to change the face of science!”
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